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5 weight loss myths

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The onslaught of weight-loss mega diets, quick-trick gismos, innovative doo-hickeys, and super-duper diet plan discounts are all about to flood the market and hit overdrive within the upcoming weeks. However, as you hustle to lose that post-season weight don’t believe all the hype.

Regardless of what magic pill you’re about to buy, here are five solid, tried-and-tested facts about weight-loss that you need to know. 

Myth 1: The never-count-calories-again diet. The fact is excess calories not burned-off during daily activities eventually contributes to weight-gain. It’s all about input versus output. You don’t have to “count” calories per say but to lose weight you have to burn more than you eat, period. You have to know how much you’ve burned and how much you’ve consumed (no matter the method). And, it’s a fact that most people overestimate their physical activity and underestimate their caloric intake.

Myth 2: Less meals means more weight-loss. When caloric intake is too low the body goes into starvation mode and your metabolism slows down and weight-loss stalls. You have to consistently and regularly feed your body for it to move and function. There are lots of theories out there, such as don’t eat more than three meals daily and don’t snack between meals to lose weight. But eating smaller meals and healthy snacks throughout the day prevents hunger, overeating, and keeps blood-sugar stable. To curb hunger and still get all your nutrients, load your plate with fruit, vegetables, beans and grains.

Myth 3: No carbohydrates, please! Some diets cut out all carbohydrates. However, diets are not lifestyle changes and that is what’s necessary to lose and keep excess weight off long-term. Once the diet is over and you resume eating regularly—you will regain the weight if you don’t watch your ratios (see myth #1.) More importantly, the body needs a certain amount of carbohydrates to function (especially the brain—it converts carbs into “brain-food.”) Seek out omega-3 fatty acids and complex carbs instead of highly-processed foods.

Myth 4: It’s all about willpower. The best way to prevent from falling off the wagon again—treat yourself occasionally. Do everything in moderation because finding that balance long-term is the true secret to leading a healthy, enjoyable and normal life. Never totally deprive yourself of the things you like. Simply use common sense and treat yourself at least once a month. Use your “willpower” to exercise consistently, shakeup your workout regularly, and stick to your weight-loss plans indefinitely.

Myth 5: Exercise alone is enough to lose weight. Cutting calories and adjusting what you eat is actually a more effective way to lose weight (if you’re already exercising.) Simply passing up on the brownies and cupcakes is easier than sweating it out on a treadmill for an hour. It takes only minutes to eat in excess, but a whole lot more hard work (and intensity) in the gym to burn it off. Consider the quality of your food by looking at the calorie density and nutritional values.

What are some of your weight-loss secrets? Are there any other myths you can add to this list?

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