• July 23, 2014

Cove struggles with disabled veterans' tax exemption

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2 comments:

  • MamaLenore posted at 8:23 am on Mon, Nov 18, 2013.

    MamaLenore Posts: 12

    Eliza wrote: At the time of that service, I'm sure no thought was given to how much these men or women might cost the tax payer in the future, if they were injured or disabled because of the service.

    Disabled Vets aren't costing tax payers money because they to do pay taxes. Others get tax breaks just as well. Being disabled doesn't mean they don't work.

     
  • Eliza posted at 6:24 am on Fri, Nov 15, 2013.

    Eliza Posts: 644

    @ Kelley is one of 'thousands' of veterans who have chosen to remain in Copperas Cove after military service. And, he is one of several veterans who qualifies for the disabled veterans property tax exemption.
    ---------
    '
    'Thousands' decided to remain in Cove (so there would be an income off of that group)

    But because 'several' receive a tax payer ( voted in by 85% of the states voters) approval break on their property tax, that group seems to be a deterrent to the city of Copperas Cove's possible future.

    This article shows just two of the people who have a total of 48 1/2 years of service between them of 'service to the country' who have lived in the Cove area, a town which was built off of the military.
    At the time of that service, I'm sure no thought was given to how much these men or women might cost the tax payer in the future, if they were injured or disabled because of the service.

    But after that service is finished,
    How soon some people are willing to forget and it all comes down to 'what are they going to cost us'?
    Its forgotten of what did it cost them? Some gave up a lot.
    Its a disgusting to think in this manner about these people and only see dollar signs when their time of service is over.

    This article today reminds me of when those 85% of the states tax payers voted on the property tax break for disabled veterans.
    When one of the areas state politicians made the statement, 'If we give it to them', then other people might come wanting something'.
    No votes for the man ever came from my household again. And never will.

    Your veterans are the last person, you would want to use as a scapegoat if you are intelligent, since it makes any remark against them sound very un-patriotic.


    As Jesus Perez stated;
    “Anybody who serves in the military and has a disability as a result deserves (the tax credit). I earned it,” said Jesus Perez who lives on South Third Street. He spent 25 ½ years in the military and served three tours in the Korean conflict and four tours in Vietnam.
    Especially having served in combat, I deserve (the property tax exemption),” he said. “I gave a lot to this country. It’s hard for a person who hasn’t served in combat to understand. If you haven’t served, you don’t truly value life.”

     

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