On Tuesday night, three Coryell County races were finally decided.

The county judge, district clerk and county treasurer positions were decided in the runoffs, with Roger Miller, Randi McFarlin and Becky Moore emerging victorious.

Runoffs were necessary in the races because none of the candidates received the required 50 percent plus one votes in the March 6 primary election.

In the county judge race, six candidates were on the March 6 ballot. Janice Gray and Roger Miller received sufficient votes to prompt a runoff.

Gray had 1,135 votes or 23.22 percent in the March primary and Miller had 1,105 votes or 22.6 percent.

In Tuesday’s election, Miller had 1,850 votes or 63.79 percent, and Gray had 1,050 votes, or 36.21 percent.

Miller served in the Army for 23 years, retiring as a first sergeant in 2013. Before that, he worked in the banking field. He is single and lives in Gatesville.

“I’m thrilled,” Miller said after the results were announced. “I’m excited that our county has an opportunity to capitalize on the change.”

Miller thanked Gray “for running an outstanding campaign” and keeping things focused on the topics and what is best for Coryell County.

Four candidates were on the March 6 ballot for district clerk.

Of those, Becky Moore achieved 48.55 percent or 2,270 votes and Jeremy Pruitt had 24.66 percent or 1,153 votes.

In Tuesday’s voting, Moore had 1,973 votes, or 68.48 percent, and Pruitt had 908 votes, or 31.52 percent.

Moore, of Gatesville, has spent 20 years working in the county clerk’s office, currently serving as chief deputy county clerk. She previously ran in 2010 for Coryell County Justice of the Peace in Precinct 4.

The county treasurer race required a runoff after Randi McFarlin received 1,749 votes, or 38.04 percent of the March 6 primary total. Cindy Hitt came in a close second, with 35.82 percent, or 1,647 votes.

Tuesday night, McFarlin scored 1,686 votes or 58.93 percent. Hitt received 1,175 votes or 41.07 percent.

McFarlin, of Jonesboro, has served as the assistant county auditor — payroll for Coryell County since 2015 and works regularly with the county treasurer. She graduated from Jonesboro High School and received her bachelor’s degree in marketing from Tarleton State University. She is a lifelong Coryell County resident and is single.

“I’m relieved and very thankful for the support and votes,” McFarlin said. She believes transitioning to her new office will go smoothly, since she’ll be able to train directly with the outgoing country treasurer, Donna Medford.

In comparison to the March 6 primary election, where 5,048 voters cast their ballots, in Tuesday’s runoffs, only a total of 3,473 people voted. There are 36,691 registered voters in Coryell County, according to elections data.

Last week’s early voting in Coryell County saw 2,267 voters casting ballots in person or by mail, meaning only 1,206 voted on Tuesday.

On November’s ballot, which will only be a formality since no Democrats are challenging them, the winners of the runoffs will be listed, as will the other Republicans who won in the March 6 primary:

  • Grant Kinsey — district judge, 440th Judicial District.
  • John R. Lee — judge, County Court-at-Law.
  • Barbara Simpson — county clerk.
  • Daren Moore — county commissioner, Precinct 2.
  • Ray Ashby — county commissioner, Precinct 4.
  • John B. Guinn — justice of the peace, Precinct 1
  • F.W. “Bill” Price — justice of the peace, Precinct 2.
  • Jim Caldwell — justice of the peace, Precinct 3.
  • Coy Latham — justice of the peace, Precinct 4.

254-501-7568 | jferraro@kdhnews.com

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