Burn Pits

Since the beginning of combat operations in Afghanistan, U.S. troops have utilized open burn pits to destroy plastics, batteries, medical waste, ammunition and everything in between so it would not fall into enemy hands or impact the environment.

According to many veterans organizations, exposure to those burn pits are directly connected to lung disease and a host of other illnesses such as cancer, respiratory problems and blood disorders.

In the three counties surrounding Fort Hood alone, nearly 60,000 veterans could have been exposed to the health-altering chemicals contained in smoke from those burn pits during deployments to Southwest Asia — which includes Iraq — since the beginning of the Gulf War Era conflict in 1990, according to the Texas Veterans Commission. That does not include the thousands of active duty troops currently stationed at Fort Hood who have been exposed.

Here is an updated list of stories on the Herald’s continued coverage of burn pit usage:

Posted July 28, 2018

Posted June 23, 2018

Posted June 16, 2018

Posted June 9, 2018

Posted June 7, 2018

Posted June 7

Posted June 6, 2018

Posted June 2, 2018

Posted May 19, 2018

Were you affected?

If you believe you may have been affected by exposure to airborne toxins and open burn pits while deployed during the Gulf War Era and are willing to tell your story, please contact reporter David A. Bryant at dbryant@kdhnews.com or 254-501-7554. Please ensure you provide your name and a reliable means of contacting you.

dbryant@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7554

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