• January 21, 2017

Staying mentally fit during holidays important for soldiers, families

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2016 4:30 am

FORT RILEY, Kan, — Many soldiers are concerned with staying physically fit during the holidays with all the tempting food choices available, but staying mentally fit is also important.

The holidays can be challenging for anyone as the season is often connected to traditions, memories and emotions — and some of those may evoke feelings of happiness or sadness. For soldiers not able to be near loved ones and family during this time, it can be especially hard.

Daily lives stay just as busy and the holidays add a layer of activities and responsibilities — both real and imagined — that take up time, money and emotional energy. Although many people look forward to the holiday season, others may long for another time, such as a leisure day at the pool in June.

Each person paints a mental picture of the ideal holiday and reality sometimes falls short. Try to manage expectations by creating new traditions, getting together with extended family or trying something new. For those of who can’t be with family, try connecting with local friends. It won’t replace the traditions you grew up with, but you might discover new ones and broaden your experiences of the holidays.

If time cannot be spent with family this holiday due to location or deployment, make it a priority to use the electronics available to reach across the miles and connect with loved ones whenever possible.

Financial stress might make some wish they could skip the whole holiday thing, but a solution is stick to a budget. Overspending carries over and affects life in the new year.

Look for opportunities to volunteer. Being in a festive atmosphere with other people doing good work can lift your mood and lead to new friendships.

Reach out to local resources if help is needed to get through the season. Most of us as at some time during our life have difficulty coping with situations — there is no shame in seeking assistance. Your Army family is there to help: Army Community Service, veteran centers and chaplains are local resources that can be contacted for assistance.

If looking for self-help, Military OneSource has information and suggestions on many topics. Visit www.militaryonesource.mil to learn more.

The bottom line is to recognize the challenges this time of year and to do the best to make it a joyful, happy season for all.

More about

More about

More about

Rules of Conduct

  • 1 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
  • 2 Don't Threaten or Abuse. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. AND PLEASE TURN OFF CAPS LOCK.
  • 3 Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
  • 4 Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
  • 5 Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
  • 6 Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.

Welcome to the discussion.

Day 1: On the ground in South Korea with Ironhorse soldiers
Posted: February 25, 2016

After 20 hours of travel, by plane and bus, I finally made it to Camp Casey, South Korea with the remainder of Fort Hood’s 1st Brigade Combat Team soldiers. For the next several days, I will be following the mission and daily lives of Ironhorse troopers as they begin a nine-month rotation in the land of the morning calm.

more »
Day 2 in South Korea: Snowflakes and readiness
Posted: February 25, 2016

Our second day in South Korea began early. But it was not as early as for some.

more »

Ft Hood Events

Military Videos