• December 18, 2014

Library strives to foster intellectual growth for all ages

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Posted: Friday, July 4, 2014 4:30 am

The Stewart C. Meyer Harker Heights Library is closed today in observance of the Fourth of July holiday.

After the festivities, the library will resume its summer programming.

While the library provides activities, programs and services that the community can participate in, or take advantage of, no one has to. A public library, by definition, provides popular and scholarly material for use by community members. What is not explicitly stated is that community members will make use of the public library. Here are a few reasons to visit the library.

The Heights library has children’s programs every day of the week, with the themes of music, play or story. It has clubs to engage children’s imagination and creativity, allow them to exercise social behaviors, and learn in a fun and safe environment. It provides programs for families to enjoy together.

As children grow older, the library provides programs tailored to the interests of teens, continuing to engage them within their growing knowledge and expanding awareness of the world. Hopefully, that awareness continues to grow, and curiosity is never stifled. Democracies depend on an engaged and knowledgeable citizenry. Citizens depend on knowledge to win and maintain freedoms. A good source of knowledge is the local public library. Harker Heights has a library director, staff and volunteers who love their library and are committed to answering the needs and interests of the community.

Recommended nonfiction: “Democracy in America,” by Alexis de Tocqueville; “Freedom Now!: Forgotten Photographs of the Civil Rights Struggle,” by Martin A. Berger; “Letter From America, 1946-2004,” by Alistair Cooke; “The Making of African America: The Four Great Migrations,” by Ira Berlin; “Rebirth of A Nation: The Making of Modern America, 1877-1920,” by Jackson Lears; “We are Still Here: A Photographic History of the American Indian Movement,” by Dick Bancroft; “Becoming American: The Chinese Experience” (DVD; “One Woman, One Vote” (DVD).

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