• December 20, 2014

Aronofsky’s ‘Noah’ is everything — except boring

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Friday, March 28, 2014 4:30 am

What to make of Darren Aronofsky’s “Noah”? Perhaps that’s the wrong question. Indeed, what NOT to make of “Noah”? Because it is so many things.

It is, of course, a biblical blockbuster, a 21st-century answer to Cecil B. DeMille. It’s also a disaster movie — the original disaster, you might say. It’s an intense family drama. Part sci-fi film. An action flick? Definitely, along the lines of “The Lord of the Rings.” At times you might also think of “Transformers,” and at one point, even “The Shining.” But there’s one thing “Noah” is not, for a moment: Dull. So, what to make of “Noah”? It’s a movie that, with all its occasional excess, is utterly worth your time — 138 minutes of it.

Although the real star of the film is its visual ingenuity, particularly in a few stunning sequences, one must give ample credit to Russell Crowe, who lends Noah the moral heft and groundedness we need to believe everything that ends up happening to him. Noah’s near-descent into madness would not be nearly as effective had Crowe not already convinced us of his essential decency. At the same time, the actor is believable when pondering the most heinous crime imaginable. It’s one of Crowe’s more effective performances.

It wouldn’t have been possible, though, without considerable liberties taken by Aronofsky and his co-screenwriter, Ari Handel, in framing Noah’s story. There’s been controversy here, but if you glance at the Bible, you’ll see why liberties are necessary: the story takes up only a few passages, hardly enough for a feature-length script.

And yet, it’s one of the best-known tales in the Bible, if most of us only remember the children’s version, with visions of brightly painted animals standing two-by-two on the ark. But there’s a much more serious backdrop: Man’s wickedness, and God’s desire to purge the earth of that wickedness. Aronofsky dives headlong into this story of good vs. evil, not only between men, but within one man’s soul.

For sheer cinematic beauty, it’s hard to beat the dreamlike sequence in which Aronofsky illustrates the story of creation, as recounted by Noah. At this moment, you may well forgive any excesses in the film. Like his flawed hero, Aronofsky has a vision — a cinematic one — and the results, if not perfect, are pretty darned compelling.

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

More about

More about

Rules of Conduct

  • 1 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
  • 2 Don't Threaten or Abuse. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. AND PLEASE TURN OFF CAPS LOCK.
  • 3 Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
  • 4 Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
  • 5 Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
  • 6 Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.

Welcome to the discussion.

Movie Trailers