• April 20, 2014

Heart transplant patients survive thanks to new devices, drugs

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Posted: Monday, November 4, 2013 4:30 am

In 1983, when Orlando Felice was 28 years old, a summer virus caused his heart to fail. For three months, the Baltimore accountant lay teetering on the edge of death until surgeons found him a new heart, from a 16-year-old girl who died in a motorcycle accident. Felice’s operation was the third heart transplant performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Since then, side effects from his anti-rejection drugs have caused Felice to undergo a kidney transplant and numerous skin cancer operations. On the most important score, however, Felice has beaten the odds: He’s had 30 years with a stranger’s heart beating in his chest, making him one of the longest-lived heart transplant patients.

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      1 comment:

      • Thomas Martin posted at 9:53 am on Mon, Dec 2, 2013.

        Thomas Martin Posts: 1

        As a former sufferer of heart failure as well as an LVAD recipient, I am sympathetic to these people. But what I learned is that heart failure can be reversed. Instead of going forward with a heart transplant, I took a holistic approach to my disease, reversed the failure and the LVAD was removed. I documented my journey and path to health in my book, "One Percent: My Journey Overcoming Heart Disease." I now speak to groups and blog on non-allopathic options to health. An LVAD definitely saved my life and bought me time to find answers, but I'm even more grateful that I chose this path and am back to a normal life with my own heart.

         

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