• November 23, 2014

Michigan mother doing all she can to avoid getting breast cancer

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Posted: Monday, October 14, 2013 4:30 am

DETROIT— Silvana Davis was 16 when breast cancer took her mother.

Now a mother herself, the 41-year-old Brighton, Mich., woman is doing everything she can to make sure she does not face the same diagnosis.

“For someone else, it’s like saying ‘You’re at risk for heart disease, so take an aspirin.’ For me it was ‘You’re at risk for breast cancer, so lose some weight,’” she said.

Although we can’t change our genetics, mounting research underscores the importance of taking steps to beat back the odds of breast cancer, a disease that this year will be diagnosed about 232,340 times and will cause about 39,620 deaths, according to the American Cancer Society.

The research is clear: Cut back the alcohol. Approach hormone replacement therapy with caution. Shave off calories, too.

If the body is the interface between genetics and environment, food is a “buffer,” said Dr. Sofia Merajver, director of the Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Evaluation Program at the University of Michigan’s Comprehensive Cancer Center.

“It can protect us or hurt us, depending on what we eat,” she said. Her advice?

Limit alcohol to three to four drinks a week.

Eat at least five vegetables a day — both leafy and cruciferous like cauliflower, broccoli and cabbage.

Go for lean protein and Vitamin D.

Exercise 30 minutes a day, six days a week. Go for core and upper-body strength training as well as aerobic exercise.

A growing body of research has strengthened the link between exercise and breast cancer risk, especially in postmenopausal women. One recent study of more than 95,000 women found that increases in physical activity after menopause lowered breast cancer risk by 10 percent, according to the American Cancer Society’s Breast Cancer Facts & Figures report.

It’s a lot of the same nutrition advice used to control other chronic diseases, making the lifestyle change “a win-win-win,” Merajver said.

“What we know right now is that essentially the same behaviors that help us control our weight and decrease the risk of diabetes, decrease the risk of strokes, decrease the rate at which we develop cardiovascular disease and reduce the risk of developing cancer,” she said.

Davis’ mother was 35 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer.

When Davis and her three sisters approached the same age, “we all just kind of freaked out,” she said.

Davis, a physician’s assistant at the University of Michigan, decided to undergo genetic testing to see whether she carried a mutation of the BRCA gene.

The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes help suppress tumors and stabilize a cell’s genetic material.

A mutation of those genes boosts the risk for cancer.

About 12 percent of women in the general population will develop breast cancer sometime during their lives; the risk jumps to 45 percent or more for those who inherit a BRCA mutation, according to the National Cancer Institute.

While waiting nearly two months for the results of the genetic tests, Davis began to make lifestyle changes.She typically ate the right foods, she said, chuckling: “I’m Italian, it was about portion control.”

As it turned out, Davis doesn’t carry a BRCA mutation and her mother may not have either. But the news didn’t send cancer out of her mind completely.

She shed 15 pounds from her 5-foot-4 frame, a loss that helped her feel like she has an edge on the disease that killed her mother:

There’s a growing awareness of trying to prevent cancer, not just treating it after diagnosis, Merajver said.

To be clear, there are no guarantees against cancer. Our genetic coding is permanent.

Aging is non-negotiable, too. Almost eight of every 10 new breast cancer cases and almost nine of every 10 breast cancer deaths are in women 50 years old and older.

But in July, a study published by NCI researchers clarified those risk factors that we can control.

The researchers found no link between tobacco use and the development of breast cancer, adding to earlier studies that question a link between smoking and breast cancer.

Of the factors we can control to reduce the risk of breast cancer, using estrogen plus progestin hormone replacement therapy contributed the most to breast cancer risk, followed by alcohol consumption and body mass index.

Consider, for example, a 50-year-old postmenopausal woman without a family history of breast cancer. She has never used hormone replacement therapy, has a normal BMI, had her first child before age 25 and has never had any diagnosis with previous breast disease. And she doesn’t drink regularly drink alcohol.

All are factors that mean she is low-risk: She has a 3.3 percent risk of developing breast cancer in 20 years.

Now add one or more alcoholic drinks per day to her life. That risk jumps to 4.1 percent.

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2 comments:

  • Dr Strangelove posted at 7:51 am on Mon, Nov 18, 2013.

    Dr Strangelove Posts: 548

    Notice it didn't say anything about the birth control, abortion link to breast cancer?

     
  • WEJohnsn posted at 7:52 pm on Mon, Oct 14, 2013.

    WEJohnsn Posts: 36

    the KDH couldn't find someone local to do a story about? this is our local paper and should reflect local news first than regional and national....local new to Detroit has no business here. i am sure this rag could find a similar local struggle if it needed this type of a story to attract readers.

    If I wanted Detroit news I would read the Detroit Free Press

    this is why I do not subscribe to this paper.


    hey I have an idea....how about traffic and crime reports for Toledo!