MONEY

The top-ranked projects proposed for inclusion on the Killeen Independent School District potential bond issue total $487 million.

Rankings were compiled from Thursday night’s bond steering committee meeting and reported Friday by KISD chief communications officer Terry Abbott.

The top priority is improving security at existing KISD schools, along with disability access renovations to bring the schools into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Abbott said in a news release Friday.

Next on the priority list are a new high school to open in 2022, consolidation of East Ward and West Ward elementary schools through building a new school, and consolidation of Pershing Park, Sugar Loaf and Bellaire elementary schools through building a new school.

Also deemed high priority projects are the construction of a new elementary school to open in 2022, renovations to Clifton Park Elementary School and construction of a new middle school, set to open in 2026.

The bond steering committee will meet again Nov. 30 to finalize a recommendation for the bond issue, to be presented to the KISD Board of Trustees at its Dec. 12 meeting. The board must vote by the Feb. 16 deadline to call a bond election for the May 5, 2018, ballot.

At a Nov. 9 bond meeting, RBC Capital presented scenarios for a $175 million, $350 million or $500 million bond issue, with the annual impact to property taxes ranging from $44 to $209 on a home valued at $150,000 with a homestead exemption.

All information about the bond steering committee meetings can be found on the website: www.killeenisdbsc.org. The public can also submit questions and comments about the bond process on the website.

By the numbers: KISD projects

Project Ranking Cost
Security, disabilities access renovations 5.0 To be determined
New high school (Open 2022) 4.9 $150-171 million
New school consolidate East/West Ward ES 4.7 $39-$45 million
New Pershing Park ES, consolidate Sugar Loaf, part of Bellaire 4.6 $44-$52 million
Elementary School #36 (Open 2022) 4.3 $43-$45 million
Clifton Park ES renovation/Bellaire ES consolidation 4.3 $44-$52 million
Middle School #15 (Open 2026) 4.1 $52-$70 million
Killeen High School renovation 4.0 $44-$52 million
Peebles ES renovation/expansion 3.9 $44-$52 million
Harker Heights Elementary renovation/expansion 3.8 $44-$52 million
Elementary School #37 (Open 2025) 3.8 $48-$58 million
Elementary School #38 (Open 2027) 3.4 $51-$65 million
Gateway HS/MS renovation 1.4 $44-$52 million

254-501-7568 | jferraro@kdhnews.com

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(2) comments

eyewatchingu

Wow, amazing how when one has pie in the sky dreams they can force others to pay for it. So once again lets do a little overview .
Lets see what type of Beverly Hills dreams they want us to pay for. BTW look at the high school cost, ask your self why does it cost more to buy 100m to build the high school ( I bet the extra cost has that 50 Mil stadium in it) If you want you child to go a Beverly Hills type high school why not move there, and pay the high taxes in Ca. Don't raise my Taxes for your gold digging taste.

Most Expensive: High schools in The USA.

1.Almost two years ago, the most expensive high school in the country was completed in Los Angeles – the Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools – to the tune of $578 million. There was plenty of hoopla to accompany the grand opening, as well as critics deriding the district for spending huge portions of their budget on such posh facilities. While this school still holds the record for the most expensive high school ever built, others fall in close behind, with state-of-the-art facilities most high school students across the country will never see. Dubbed “Taj Mahal” schools, these institutions offer first-class amenities, along with their eye-popping price tags

2.Another Los Angeles school with a hefty price tag is the Edward R. Roybal Learning Center, which was built in downtown Los Angeles in 2009, with a final price tag of $377 million. The project took 23 years to complete because construction had to be halted twice: once in 1999 after underground methane gas was discovered and again in 2002 when a seismic fault line was found. American School and University reports that a new architect took over the project in 2003 and transformed the plan to create a positive learning environment that will benefit students well into the future.
 
The Edward R. Roybal Learning Center is set on a 25-acre campus, and it includes a triple gym and a dance studio with a cushioned floor, according to AOL News. The school holds around 2,500 students and offers nearly 73,000 square feet of classroom space, 418 underground parking spaces and a 100-acre community park.


3.The final Los Angeles school on this list is the Central No. 9 Visual and Performing Arts High School that cost $232 million to complete. Students at this school can study performing arts, crafts, photography and film making in a positive environment that fosters creativity. According to the Los Angeles Daily News, the building, which is sandwiched between the Disney Concert Hall and the Museum of Contemporary Art, took nine years to complete.
 
The school is breathtaking, inside and out. The exterior features a large, steel spiral sculpture, and the interior is filled with airy classrooms and studios. The school boasts a 950-seat performing arts center, a 300-car parking garage and an outdoor atrium for Japanese raku pottery.

4. Not all the expensive schools are located on the west side of the country. Newton North High School, located in Newtonville, Massachusetts, opened in the fall of 2010 with a price tag of $197.5 million. According to Boston.com, the school won the 2011 Award for Design Excellence from the Boston Society of Architects.
 
“We thought the new layout for the site, which brings the entrance to the school into play with the sports field, was brilliant,” one of the judges told Boston.com.
 
The school features state-of-the-art athletic facilities, a swimming pool and climbing wall. A television studio is also located on the campus, which encompasses 413,000 square feet and accommodates 1,865 students.

5. The last school on the list is also located on the East Coast – New Brunswick High School in New Jersey. The school, which cost $185 million, holds 1,300 students with 400,000 square feet. The school boasts athletic fields with state-of-the-art lighting, rooftop solar panels and Smart Boards instead of traditional blackboards.

Whether expensive facilities correlate with improved learning will take time to reveal, but these campuses certainly have awe-inspiring amenities that can excite students to attend school.


Now lets take a look at no. 5 seems that price tag revolved around athletic fields.
At a price tag of $185 Million

Now think about this the price tag for a home in those cities are starting at 500k to the high end of $200 Million. So I can understand why the kids in those area get to have the bells and whistles , they can afford to live on pie in the sky dreams.

So once again I am asking the voters in Killeen to see though this crazy, wasteful spending on Beverly Hills and Caviar Dreams.
Stick to the basic needs and stick to a budget.

VOTE NO ON THIS BOND
VOTE NO SEND THE MESSAGE WE ARE NOT CA, Blue Polices will only put more home owners homeless. Just like CA will be paying taxes so high we will end up with a high rate of homeless. VOTE NO ON BLUE POLICIES

Alvin

This the personal opinion of this writer.

Just this morning:

Copy: 'At Thursday night’s Killeen Independent School District bond steering committee meeting, held at the KISD Career Center, members of the committee learned that the total cost of projects under consideration for the potential bond issue could exceed $700 million.'

Continuation of copy: 'The top-ranked projects proposed for inclusion on the Killeen Independent School District potential bond issue total $487 million.' End of copy.

You people throw around 213 million as it is pocket change. Will the real bond issue please stand up.

The wide variance astounds me. I thought an estimate was given and then you could employ a contingency, but it looks like you employ 10 to 35 percent contingencies, and if these numbers are not variances pertaining to contingencies, the what are you doing, drawing numbers out of the shy????

Do you already have construction plans or is again 'a rough estimate' of what the cost will be.

If these are some high pie in the sky 'wishes you have here.


This has been the personal opinion of this writer and nothing shall be used, in context or without or changed in any way without first notifying, and receiving explicit approval from this writer.
One of the 4.58 % who voted.

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