• October 21, 2014

Killeen council to debate citywide recycling

Cost of implementing program would be paid through increases in residential trash bills

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Posted: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 4:30 am

Today’s Killeen City Council debate over citywide, mandatory curbside recycling will begin with a new financial analysis.

The estimated $4.6 million program would overhaul the city’s solid waste collection services, if adopted by the City Council.

According to a June poll of 500 Daily Herald readers, more than 57 percent supported mandatory, citywide recycling.

“Many people want the service and, I think, recycling is good for the environment,” Killeen Mayor Dan Corbin said.

The city’s current, voluntary recycling program has low participation — just 3,550 of the city’s 46,000 households recycle.

Participants in the program are charged $2.48 per month to recycle, while those who do not recycle pay standard solid waste rates.

A citywide program, if adopted, would not affect the ad valorem tax rate, City Manager Glenn Morrison said.

The costs of implementing the program — purchasing recycling trucks, carts and hiring personnel — would be paid through hikes in residential trash bills.

At the last presentation June 4, city staff estimated a $2.50 increase in residential trash bills to pay for the program.

Residents who divert recyclable material from their trash could save money by using a smaller trash can, which comes at a lower rate.

Recycling also could save residents money in the future because of the scarcity for space at the Temple Landfill, where Killeen and cities from seven counties in Texas, dump their trash.

Hauling Killeen’s trash to another dump site could be costly, Corbin said.

With many variables, Corbin said he was not sure how citywide mandatory recycling would affect the trash rates in the long run.

“Some costs go up while other costs go down,” Corbin said. “There are many factors we have to consider. I don’t think it is going to be an easy decision.”

In other matters, the council is expected to discuss a consent agreement with Bell County Municipal Utility District No. 2 and action on a lawsuit filed against the city by former finance director Barbara Gonzales.

Both items are expected to be discussed in closed session.

If you go

The Killeen City Council workshop will be at 5 p.m. today at the Killeen Utility Collections Building, 210 W. Avenue C.

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Welcome to the discussion.

5 comments:

  • Randy Johnson posted at 9:46 pm on Tue, Jul 23, 2013.

    Randy Johnson Posts: 20

    Hey Victor...You think those Beer cans that are in the picture were bought with Glenn's credit card?

     
  • Viktor posted at 10:42 am on Tue, Jul 23, 2013.

    Viktor Posts: 317

    Let's just be real. Killeen doesn't have time to look into cost saving measures. Recycling should really pay for itself. Yet here residents can expect an increase in their bills. No doubt recycling is good for the environment. It's the way this city goes about enforcing the concept of recycling that makes it unappealing. Who wants to pay extra money to do a good thing? @PlayFair: Well said!

     
  • PlayFair posted at 9:58 am on Tue, Jul 23, 2013.

    PlayFair Posts: 10

    There are recycling models throughout the U.S. that have recycling lowering household trash cost. Many charge adjustable rates based on non-recyclable trash. I have lived in at least one of these cities. I do recycle many items to reduce the amount of trash going to the dump, but refuse to participate in Killeen's program. They need to negotiate with companies that won't charge for recycle pick-up. The present company is making money on both ends. They charge for the collection of recyclables that will be sold. Imagine Goodwill charging for drop-offs or Amvet charging for pick-ups. Killeen continues to hold its citizen hostage to bad ideas.

     
  • Dr Strangelove posted at 9:51 am on Tue, Jul 23, 2013.

    Dr Strangelove Posts: 510

    Well looks like the City is going stick to us again. Let’s see you’re going to charge us to recycle then sell the stuff and make more money. Also notice you have this meeting at five P.M. when most of us are still at work.

    [censored]

     
  • Alvin posted at 3:06 pm on Mon, Jul 22, 2013.

    Alvin Posts: 207

    Well the city is at it again. The city conducted a poll of a grand total of 500 KDH readers and came up with the number of 57% approval rate for mandatory curbside recycling. Now I ask you, why was it held to news readers – not city wide? Do you think that a city wide poll would be any different than restricting it to KDH News Only? I certainly do. Why are they so hell bent on charging the residents and not providing this as a free service? Just another disservice to the residents of Killeen.

     

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