• November 22, 2014

Killeen, NAACP mark anniversary of King speech

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Posted: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 4:30 am | Updated: 1:16 pm, Tue Aug 27, 2013.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, the Killeen Branch of the NAACP and the city of Killeen teamed up to host “The Dream Lives On” event Monday night at the Killeen Arts & Activities Center.

The event was a way to bring the city together on a unified front regardless of race, color or creed, said TaNeika Driver-Moultrie, president of the Killeen NAACP.

“This day is very important for the city of Killeen not just to commemorate Dr. Martin Luther King’s life and legacy but most importantly, it allows us to

know that the dream continues to live on and what better place than the city of Killeen,” she said.

Ann Farris, assistant city manager for Internal Services, said the Killeen community celebrates the memory of the march and King’s character.

“It has to do with inequity and not only feeling what other people feel but doing something about it,” she said.

Members of the community and the NAACP came out to the event, along with city officials including Mayor Pro Tem Elizabeth Blackstone.

Following a reception, guests gathered in the center’s auditorium for the ceremony, led by Driver-Moultrie and Jared Foster, councilman at large.

The room was quiet as guests watched the footage of King giving his “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in 1963.

Keynote speaker Gary Bledsoe, president of the Texas State Conference of NAACP Units, spoke about King’s goal for racial equality and the journey that remains.

“He very much wanted to have an interracial dialogue and he believed to the core that people need to be able to get together and work towards the common good,” he said.

“I think he would be disappointed in the acrimony of the nation and the refusal to respect each other.”

Wednesday is the actual anniversary of King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

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2 comments:

  • Eliza posted at 2:11 pm on Tue, Aug 27, 2013.

    Eliza Posts: 864

    Dr. Kings speech was to my thinking, one of the most magnificent speeches I have heard or read. What a wonderful orator of words he was.-

    My special favorite lines from his Dream speech were his words,

    When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

    and then he later followed them with the words;

    But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

    I believe he like our forefathers meant, when they themselves wrote the Peoples Constitution, at which time they said , 'let those in our future decipher our words in the way they were meant at the time they were stated'.

    King left his words of warning about bitterness and hatred for the young and any others to decipher and who was willing to understand.
    Hoping they would know what he was taking of and let no one who couldn't understand or accept his words , influence them otherwise.

    God Bless MLK , for his many words of wisdom he left for us all.

     
  • Eliza posted at 11:10 am on Tue, Aug 27, 2013.

    Eliza Posts: 864

    Dr. Kings speech was to my thinking, one of the most magnificent speeches I have heard or read. What a wonderful orator of words he was.-

    My special favorite lines from his speech was his words,

    When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

    and then he later followed them with the words;

    But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds.
    Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

    I believe he like our forefathers, meant when they wrote the
    Peoples Constitution, and when they said ,let those in our future decipher our words in the way they were meant at the time they were stated.

    King left his words about bitterness and hatred for the young who would come after him. Hoping they would understand what he was taking of and let no one who couldn't understand him, influence them otherwise.

    God Bless MLK and for his many words of wisdom he left for us all.