Water resolutions

As the Texas population continues to rise, various organizations across the state, including the city of Killeen, are encouraging the public to save water in multiple ways.

A short agenda for Tuesday’s Killeen City Council meeting will include a public hearing and possible vote to update its water conservation protocols.

During last week’s workshop meeting, the council was presented with a recommendation from Danielle Singh, the city’s interim executive director of public works, to have a chapter in its ordinance that reflects how the city will conserve its available water supply.

City staff recommends repealing and replacing Chapter 30, Article 1 currently titled Water Conservation.

Singh said the changes will enable residents who live and work throughout the region “to have a better understanding and more cohesive plan for conserving water and responding to water supply emergencies.”

“Chapter 11 of the Texas Water Code and Title 30 of the Texas Administrative Code require the city to submit an updated water conservation plan and drought contingency plan to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board every five years,” Singh said to the council on April 16.

If approved, the new ordinance — titled Water Conservation and Drought Contingency Plan — highlights various procedures including public education, drought response measures, its coordination with regional water planning groups and who is authorized to initiate water monitoring.

“The stages, triggers, and restrictions are aligned with regional plans. This has no additional requirements to citizens; just formatting changes to meet those two things; both the Centex Sustainability and the model ordinance,” Singh said.

During the workshop, Councilwoman Shirley Fleming asked Singh if rainwater retention can be a possible addition to the plan.

“We can look at other sections of the ordinance to account for some of that ... but this is specific to what we are able to include into it. This is really about how we, if there is a drought situation, what type of water restrictions start to kick in,” Singh answered.

No other councilmember had questions during the workshop on the possible new ordinance.

Killeen officials originally adopted and implemented the water conservation plan in 1998 and revised it in 2006 to include a drought contingency plan.

The meeting starts at 5 p.m. at City Hall, 101 N. College St.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.