One of the following six people could be the next Killeen police chief: Gregory Burns, Jr., Steven Henry, John Houston, Charles Kimble, Marlin Price, Patrick South.

The city announced the finalists in a news release Wednesday, and City Manager Ron Olson has invited the six to Killeen for interviews July 20-22. The finalists were chosen from among 42 applicants.

Chris Hartung Consulting Services in Euless led the search that began April 23, months after former Police Chief Dennis Baldwin moved to become interim city manager. Baldwin is now assistant city manager.

Current Interim Police Chief Margaret Young did not apply, she told the Herald, but did not say why. Young, the first woman to be named chief in department history, expects to return to her previous role as assistant chief when the top spot is filled.

The cost to the city for the search is $10,000 plus expenses.

Texas law and city purchasing policy require expenditures above $50,000 to be competitively bid and approved by the City Council. Because the cost is below that, the city manager can authorize it.

Among the problems a new chief will need to address are employee turnover, a tight budget and an increase in violent crime.

Killeen reported 16 killings in 2016 and 17 the previous year, police data show. Since Jan. 1 of this year, 10 homicide investigations were started in separate cases.

Local political candidates previously called for more active neighborhood participation and community policing, a term used to define the role of officers in neighborhoods.

It remains to be seen what a new police chief will decide, and how he will navigate tightening budget constraints.

Starting salary will be at most $124,688, a city brochure says.

Baldwin was paid $12,974.88 per month, or about $155,698 annually.

The city spends about $75,000 to bring a new officer online, including benefits, equipment, salary, and psychological and medical exams, Young had said.

Department attrition is fought through financial incentives and advancement opportunities, but at least three officers have resigned since July of last year, citing higher salary needs, she said.

Probationary police officers for up to the first 18 months of employment are considered noncivil service staff, and are paid from the General Pay Plan. Entry-level pay is $21.60 per hour, $3,743.33 monthly or about $44,920 annually.

After the probation period, officers are paid from the Police Pay Plan, which begins at $4,071 monthly or $48,851 per year. By comparison, entry-level Georgetown police officers make more, at $51,542 per year.

Other reasons for leaving the department have varied: one left for military service; eight recently retired; and some were unable to finish the training process or chose not to do so, Young said.

The Killeen Police Department does not require a commitment from new officers to serve a minimum period, although it has been considered, Young said.

In April, the police department was at 91 percent capacity (255 of 280) of sworn positions, and fewer than half (49 of 103) of nonsworn positions were filled.

FINALISTS

Gregory Burns, Jr. has more than 28 years of law enforcement experience. He has served the Louisville (Kentucky) Metro Police Department for 24 years. Previous experience includes being assistant chief of police/support bureau since 2014. Burns holds both a bachelor of science in criminal justice from Bethel University and associate degree of applied science in criminal justice from Jefferson Community and Technical College.

Steven Henry has more than 24 years of law enforcement experience. He served the Chandler (Arizona) Police Department for 15 years before serving eight years as chief deputy with the Pinal County (Arizona) Sheriff’s Department. Henry has a master’s degree in educational leadership from Northern Arizona University and a bachelor of arts in history from Arizona State University.

John Houston has more than 37 years of experience in law enforcement with the Corpus Christi Police Department. He is its administration division commander and served roles throughout the organization. Houston has a bachelor of arts in criminal justice from Saint Leo University.

Charles Kimble has more than 25 years law enforcement experience. He is police chief of the Spring Lake (North Carolina) Police Department. His career includes 20 years at the Fayetteville (North Carolina) Police Department and two years at the Fayetteville State University Police Department. Kimble has a bachelor of science in criminal justice from Liberty University and an associate of arts in criminal justice from Central Texas College.

Marlin Price worked in law enforcement for 44 years. He is a law enforcement consultant for the Texas Police Chiefs Association. He served as police chief for Southlake Department of Public Safety for five years after 28 years at the Dallas Police Department; 15 were as deputy chief and assistant chief. Price has a masters of public administration from the University of North Texas and a bachelor of science in law enforcement and criminal justice from Sam Houston State University.

Patrick South has 24 years law enforcement experience with the Austin Police Department. He was a police commander for the department for more than five years, and served in leadership roles in the organization. South has a bachelor’s of business administration in finance from Texas A&M University.

MEET AND GREET

Finalists will tour the city and meet with city staff before interviewing with management, employees and a community panel, spokeswoman Hilary Shine said in the Wednesday news release.

An opportunity for the public to meet finalists will be July 20 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Killeen Community Center.

Shine did not say how the community panel was chosen, and said there would be no opportunity for the public to observe the interviews prior to City Manager Olson’s final decision.

asierra@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7463

(6) comments

Alvin
Alvin

This is the personal opinion of this writer.
First thing I want to mention is; 'Why is the city manager, alone, the one to be responsible for placing the new chief of Police???? Why isn't it a function of the city council????
This then means, and indicates, that he alone will be 'in control', and he potentially, the new chief of police, will be 'the new handpicked chief of police' that will answer to this city.
Copy: 'The city spends about $75,000 to bring a new officer online, including benefits, equipment, salary, and psychological and medical exams, Young had said.'
Continuation of copy: 'Department attrition is fought through financial incentives and advancement opportunities, but at least three officers have resigned since July of last year, citing higher salary needs, she said.'
Continuation of copy: 'Probationary police officers for up to the first 18 months of employment are considered noncivil service staff, and are paid from the General Pay Plan. Entry-level pay is $21.60 per hour, $3,743.33 monthly or about $44,920 annually.
After the probation period, officers are paid from the Police Pay Plan, which begins at $4,071 monthly or $48,851 per year. By comparison, entry-level Georgetown police officers make more, at $51,542 per year.'
Continuation of copy: 'Other reasons for leaving the department have varied: one left for military service; eight recently retired; and some were unable to finish the training process or chose not to do so, Young said.'
Continuation of copy: 'The Killeen Police Department does not require a commitment from new officers to serve a minimum period, although it has been considered, Young said.'
Continuation of copy: 'In April, the police department was at 91 percent capacity (255 of 280) of sworn positions, and fewer than half (49 of 103) of nonsworn positions were filled.' End of copy.
I believe I read, in Sept, 2014, that we currently have 256 officers. Now how many officers have we trained, at the sum of $75,000 for each officer that 'we' bring online. I would like to inquire, 'how many officers have 'we trained, at the sum of $75,000 dollars per man and that is to point out that we now have 1 officer than we were spouting that we had in Sept. 2014. I would like to know, 'how does this add up'???? We've continued to keep the academy pushing out graduates, but the numbers aren't changing.
Copy: 'Department attrition is fought through financial incentives and advancement opportunities, but at least three officers have resigned since July of last year, citing higher salary needs, she said.' End of copy.
Apparently that does not work, financial incentives nor does the apparent advancement opportunities.
Now the excuse was George town has a higher salary cap than does Killeen. So in 2014, Morrison the then city manager gave them an 8% plus 3% to offset this. Did not work.
If you take the Georgetown entry level position at $51,542 and Kileen's entry level position at $44,920 you get a $6,622 annual delta or $551 monthly.
Now the $75,000 for each officer that is goes through the Killeen police academy and then you take for instance the fact that:
Copy: 'Probationary police officers for up to the first 18 months of employment are considered noncivil service staff, and are paid from the General Pay Plan.' End of copy.
What's there to considered, the police department probationary policeman is paid from the General Pay Plan and not a part of the Police budget. Such a deal.
Then I would pass on my personal opinion, that the individual candidate sign a pledge that when graduating, the individual candidate must serve at least 3 full years following graduation in the police department to qualify for a free training program. And it would follow that the police department, upon graduation, and when the police officer gets into full time service that the the police department picks up their salary and benefits.
It is not right to have the city coffers pick up the tab for academy training and up to 18 months of their serving on the police force. Let the police department have the full weight of responsibility for their own department. Maybe that would spur them into action of taking responsibility for their own actions.
And finally, I did not see what @Phenom Enochs: statements pertaining to the unknown committee of sorts, but I would agree that this type of operation, such as the past police chief, Dennis Baldwin, anyone of the Whitis company, or any such candidate that is projected to be a candidate, let someone of known caliber and trust sit on this committee or such play.
This has been the personal opinion of this writer and nothing shall be used, in context or without or changed in any way without first notifying, and receiving explicit approval from this writer.
One of the 4.58 % who voted.

Pharon Enochs

The following comments are indeed the opinions of Pharon Enochs A citizens panel will be part of the interview process but no menition of how members were selected or who was selected as members. So as far as the general public knows the panel could be Corbin, Morrison and Whitis or it could be a couple of drunks who just got out of jail. Why is everything clouded in mystery within the city government? Is it because of the old it's always been done this way or is it the city has no real planning just an idea which pops up and everyone involves shouts great idea? Next it will probably be said the citizen's panel worked hard on this process so they should be be rewarded with a fool's gold wrist watch. I suppose the SWAT Team will escort the canidates around town and guard the doors and windows of the interview room while regular patrol units guard the building proper. No leaks will be allowed and the taxpayers will get the results at the leisure of who? A subcommittee member, the mayor, one or all members of the public information department or will it be like when Olson was hired initially noone hired but later as the public awaits a new selection process then it is announced one of the previouly interviewed canidates is hired? Sounds about par for the course in Killeen the City without limits. God bless America, President Trump, the next police chief of Killeen (I feel he is certainly going to need it) and John Wayne wherve he may be.

eyewatchingu
eyewatchingu

Patrick South  Hmm not so bad at les he is smart and he can come up with a plan http://www.popcenter.org/library/awards/goldstein/1994/94-08.pdf

eyewatchingu
eyewatchingu

Marlin Price bio on SRG https://www.governmentresource.com/Marlin_Price_bio he even works for SRG since 2014

eyewatchingu
eyewatchingu

Got to love this one
Marlin Price
Senior Vice President, Executive Recruitment
Marlin Price joined SGR in December 2014, after having spent more than 40 years in Law Enforcement.  Marlin began his career in the Dallas Police Department in 1972, serving more than 28 years, the last 12, as Assistant Chief of Police.  He was selected as Chief of Police for the City of Southlake, Texas, in 2000, and served there until his retirement in 2005.  Since 2005, Marlin served as Director of the Texas Police Chiefs Association’s Best Practices Recognition Program, a State Law Enforcement Accreditation program.  He retired from that position in 2014 to join SGR.
Marlin has a Bachelors of Science in Law Enforcement and a Masters of Public Administration.  He is a graduate of the FBI Academy, the Senior Management Institute for Police, and the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration’s Command and Management Course.
Contact Marlin by Email.

SRG the same group that was paid to find the city a city manager

eyewatchingu
eyewatchingu

Gregory Burns, Jr. has more than 28 years of law enforcement experience. He has served the Louisville (Kentucky) Metro Police Department for 24 years. Previous experience includes being assistant chief of police/support bureau since 2014. Burns holds both a bachelor of science in criminal justice from Bethel University and associate degree of applied science in criminal justice from Jefferson Community and Technical College.
Reasons why I do not think he is right for our city. Firstly, he cant even get hired or voted into a job. Seems he has been passed over in the last three years then any of them. http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2017/jul/02/four-candidates-police-chief-talk-about-their-what/ there are many other sites as well. Secondly, I looked around on the internet for group in his area and found he is one of the most hated officers for a number of reasons and the most often said was that he is very racist and is very well known in special interest groups ( known black hate groups). Here is another city that didn't choose him as well. http://www.dnronline.com/update/new-hpd-chief-finalist-for-kansas-job/article_2c2b14f2-581a-11e7-aa37-8397e6523283.html. Like I said he has been passed over for many reasons and should remain on the side lines. Or we will see violent crimes increase and human trafficking doubled with him around.

Steven Henry has more than 24 years of law enforcement experience. He served the Chandler (Arizona) Police Department for 15 years before serving eight years as chief deputy with the Pinal County (Arizona) Sheriff’s Department. Henry has a master’s degree in educational leadership from Northern Arizona University and a bachelor of arts in history from Arizona State University.
1. First reason I would not want him, besides coming from the land of lawless police officers, like that nut case they had in Maricopa county, who my husband sadly had to deal with, because my husband I guess looks Mexican or at lest what they think one looks like. This man is coming from a back ground and area that has had its fair share of corruption. http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/babeus-elite-staff-overcomes-bad-behavior-with-loyalty-6457515 According to Chief Henry, "after an exhaustive investigation" by LaWall's office "that was fraught with inaccuracies and misrepresentations, Gaffney was cleared of any wrongdoing."
Yet I would choose him before Gregory Burns, Jr, If I was choosing! http://www.pinalcentral.com/casa_grande_dispatch/area_news/lamb-easily-wins-pinal-sheriff-s-race/article_da719f8c-a644-11e6-9d51-d70e6c6615cc.html

John Houston has more than 37 years of experience in law enforcement with the Corpus Christi Police Department. He is its administration division commander and served roles throughout the organization. Houston has a bachelor of arts in criminal justice from Saint Leo University.https://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/law/new-texas-law-will-fine-police-for-not-reporting-shootings/
1. Just the article alone says it all. How can a officer not respond to shots fired call.

Charles Kimble has more than 25 years law enforcement experience. He is police chief of the Spring Lake (North Carolina) Police Department. His career includes 20 years at the Fayetteville (North Carolina) Police Department and two years at the Fayetteville State University Police Department. Kimble has a bachelor of science in criminal justice from Liberty University and an associate of arts in criminal justice from Central Texas College.
1. Charles Kimble formally sworn in as Spring Lake police chief http://www.fayobserver.com/51f6a7bc-2f41-504c-84fe-4787091c4934.html
By Michael Futch Staff writer
Posted Jan 9, 2017 at 12:01 AM
Updated Jan 9, 2017 at 9:34 PM


SPRING LAKE - Charles Kimble, the former head of the Fayetteville State University campus police, was formally sworn in as Spring Lake’s new police chief Monday night during the town’s Board of Aldermen meeting.
Kimble, 47, replaces Troy McDuffie, who retired Jan. 1 after three decades as a lawman that included the last seven as Spring Lake’s chief of police, where McDuffie, 53, led the department’s rebuilding process from an embarrassing corruption scandal.
“He literally turned this into a whole new police department,” Kimble told the board. “Some of you are still here, and some of you are first-hand eyewitnesses to the turnaround. ... My goal is to continue those efforts and take it to the next level. We will tackle crime and deter crime on a daily basis.”
Cumberland County District Court Judge Cheri Siler-Mack administered the oath to Kimble before a packed room of about 130 people.
She sworn him in as the chief of police at FSU in November 2014.
This time, Kimble recited the oath with his right hand raised and left hand placed on a Bible held by his wife, Yon.
Before she began, Siler-Mack told town officials that they had selected the right man for the job.
“He’s a people person, a wonderful friend, a dedicated servant and a committed person,” the judge said. “So Spring Lake, I commend you for extending chief of police to Charles Kimble.”
Kimble, who has served in law enforcement for more than 25 years, began his career with the Milwaukee Police Department before joining the Fayetteville Police Department for nearly 20 years. That tenure included a role as assistant chief in the department.

Three years ago, Kimble was one of three men seeking to oust then longtime Cumberland County sheriff Moose Butler in the Democratic primary.
Kimble finished second behind Butler, who has since retired.
Kimble’s salary will be roughly $85,000, according to Spring Lake Town Manager Tad Davis. Kimble reports directly to Davis.
Kimble was chosen out of 36 applicants, Davis said.
“This is a great day for our community,” Spring Lake Mayor Chris Rey said. “There’s no secret - the history of Spring Lake. And where we were, where we are and where we’re going.
“One of the most important decisions that is always made by management is (on) the individuals going to be in top slots, whether it’s the police department, the fire department or the critical departments that run the city day to day.
“But this particular hire is very important to not only this board, but also to the citizens of Spring Lake,” Rey said. “This is truly the department that has the most interaction with our citizens. Sometimes it’s not the best interaction, but it is sometimes a necessary interaction. And it takes a very special individual to not only serve as chief, but be someone to serve as police officer to man and handle all the situations in our community. I want to believe - and I think I speak on behalf of our board - that I believe we got it right.”
Hmm, so why is he wanting to work here, besides once again having a background in a special interest group, and thinking he will cash in on higher pay. Foe those that do not know, where he is from, the bloods and crips had an all out war and has become part of the normal. He will not go after the street gangs, he will target only whites that have things. His history shows it. Also the fact he is working for a city that just hired him and now he is looking to work for Killeen tx, what a joke wake up and let the people vote if this shows what we are offered.
As for the last two, smh. I cant humiliate them, they have done that themselves.

I guess if I had to pick, it would be none of these above. Rather have Baldwin at lest he is the lesser of the demons being offered to us. Two known officers with affillations to gangs and special interest groups. Just told me all I needed to know where the city is headed.
Here are some good links to the gangs wars in NC https://www.nationalgangcenter.gov/Gang-Related-News?st=NC
Just a heads up, these are not the ones that take down gangs in the area of Louisville Ky and NC its the Feds themselves, because the officers from these two areas are so gang related its sick.
Good luck Killeen. Hope our city manager will just turn off city council and listen to himself and pick the right one

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