Four new boarding bridges are on the way to the Killeen-Fort Hood Regional Airport after the city of Killeen issued a bid online for the federally funded project.

According to a bid posted on the city’s website May 23, the city is seeking a contractor to remove and replace boarding bridges at gates 2-5 at the regional airport. The total cost of the project from design to construction is $6 million, according to the city, with construction expected to begin in November or December.

The city said the four gates have been operational since the airport was constructed in 2004 and have had significant issues in recent years.

“Despite a rigorous preventative maintenance program used by the airport, these bridges are experiencing ever increasing mechanical and maintenance issues,” a city memo read. “Not only does this limit the operational capability of the Airport to meet our customer service goals, it has also affected our airline partners as well.”

In November 2016, the council approved a $599,400 agreement with Garver, LLC, for design, bidding, contract administration and construction services for improvements to the bridges funded in part through the Federal Aviation Administration’s Airport Improvement Program.

The federal grant requires a 10-percent local match paid through a $4.50 Passenger Facility Charge on airfare, which the council approved in June 2016. Due to the funding arrangement, the city will not have to pay any extra funds toward the project.

The bids are due to the city by 2 p.m. July 10.

kyleb@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7567

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