Life Moves Yoga

Life Moves Yoga studio manager and instructor Amanda Brown prepares to lead a Thursday evening class. The studio was voted one of the "Top 10 Nicest Places in America" by Reader's Digest and "Good Morning America."

Life Moves Yoga in Killeen has been selected as one of the “Top 10 Nicest Places in America,” according to Reader’s Digest.

The local studio is currently in the running to win a feature story in the nationally read magazine and a spotlight story on “Good Morning America.”

Beating out over 500 submissions from across the country, Life Moves Yoga was nominated by two regular attendees.

While Beth Funk founded Life Moves Yoga, it was yoga that found her 15 years ago.

At the time, she was working for Killeen Independent School District, her husband was deployed and she was trying to balance raising two teenagers, working full-time and completing her master’s degree — all while trying to recover from a major back injury.

Dealing with severe and sometimes incapacitating pain, Funk struggled to find a solution to help her heal.

After relocating to Kansas for her husband’s job as a lieutenant general in the Army, someone suggested she try yoga.

“How is that going to help me?” Funk thought at the time. “But I decided to try it and commit to trying it, going regularly and see if this thing really works.”

Although she was skeptical, she attended multiple classes a week. Three weeks into it, everything started to change.

“I saw it happening,” she recalled. “I was blown away, so I started researching why it was working and was so intrigued with the process.

“Every week I got stronger and healthier. I got better after doing this a year and decided to take the training to teach yoga.”

What makes Life Moves Yoga different from other studios is the variety of classes geared to helping anyone interested in seeing if yoga can make a difference in his or her life.

With a personal connection to the military — not only through her husband but her father-in-law, Lt. Gen. Paul Funk Sr., a Vietnam and Desert Storm veteran who served until 1996 — Funk has seen the need for this kind of release.

“I felt called to the work,” she said. “With my deep passion for our service members and veterans, and what they go through and how much they need another way to heal.”

When she lived in Washington, D.C., there was a studio on every block.

“It wasn’t, ‘Do you do yoga?’ but ‘Where do you do yoga?’” Funk recalled.

With few studios in town, she decided to “take a leap of faith” and create a yoga home for the Killeen community.

Funk will tell you, “If you can breathe, you can practice yoga,” and Life Moves Yoga strives to prove that every day with classes that allow variations to accommodate people with pain syndroms or injuries.

“The program can be motified and we offer gentle pose classes,” she said, adding they have chair yoga open to any age.

When she opened the studio, Funk had the mission to reach those who needed yoga within this military community.

“Which is why I was committed to putting something here near the gates of Fort Hood for easy access,” she explained. “I’ve been watching this for a long time; this has been my lifestyle.

“My husband has been on repeated deployments, I knew the need was here and I’m trying to meet it.”

But yoga isn’t for those who need an escape to relax from the stress of the day or relief from the pain. The studio offers Warrior Yoga, a class for those who currently serve and are looking for a different kind of strength.

“The mindfulness that comes with yoga — being able to take a step back, settle into your practice, have your own space — I think it’s so powerful for these people who have high speed jobs, physical stress, mental stress,” said Amanda Brown, studio manager and teacher at Life Moves Yoga. “I think it’s important for people to have a time and a space for themselves.”

Not only do the classes benefit those who serve but those who are here holding down their home front.

“We have a lot of people whose spouses are deployed, working as a single parent and they have all the stress of taking care of the family and doing everything on their own,” Brown explained. “They can come here and get deserved time for themselves, along with the community that comes with it.”

Funk’s overall goal is to use yoga to help as many people as possible, which is why her studio also offers yoga teacher training.

“We would love to be as involved as much as possible to reach greater needs in the community,” she explained.

Partnered with a fellow Army spouse from Fort Bragg, Funk trains those wanting to teach with the skills necessary to teach various forms of yoga.

“There’s a therapeutic training module to prepare teacher to work with everybody,” said Funk, “to modify and adapt with a portion of training with members with post-traumatic stress, pain syndrome.

“A big part of our mission is not just classes but teaching other to teach to further reach more people.”

Voting for the winning nicest place is now open at 10best.com/nicest and closes on July 7.

Life Moves Yoga in Killeen has been selected as one of the “Top 10 Nicest Places in America,” according to Reader’s Digest.

The local studio is currently in the running to win a feature story in the nationally read magazine and a spotlight story on “Good Morning America.”

Beating out over 500 submissions from across the country, Life Moves Yoga was nominated by two regular attendees.

While Beth Funk founded Life Moves Yoga, it was yoga that found her 15 years ago.

At the time, she was working for Killeen Independent School District, her husband was deployed and she was trying to balance raising two teenagers, working full-time and completing her master’s degree — all while trying to recover from a major back injury.

Dealing with severe and sometimes incapacitating pain, Funk struggled to find a solution to help her heal.

After relocating to Kansas for her husband’s job as a lieutenant general in the Army, someone suggested she try yoga.

“How is that going to help me?” Funk thought at the time. “But I decided to try it and commit to trying it, going regularly and see if this thing really works.”

Although she was skeptical, she attended multiple classes a week. Three weeks into it, everything started to change.

“I saw it happening,” she recalled. “I was blown away, so I started researching why it was working and was so intrigued with the process.

“Every week I got stronger and healthier. I got better after doing this a year and decided to take the training to teach yoga.”

What makes Life Moves Yoga different from other studios is the variety of classes geared to helping anyone interested in seeing if yoga can make a difference in his or her life.

With a personal connection to the military — not only through her husband but her father-in-law, Lt. Gen. Paul Funk Sr., a Vietnam and Desert Storm veteran who served until 1996 — Funk has seen the need for this kind of release.

“I felt called to the work,” she said. “With my deep passion for our service members and veterans, and what they go through and how much they need another way to heal.”

When she lived in Washington, D.C., there was a studio on every block.

“It wasn’t, ‘Do you do yoga?’ but ‘Where do you do yoga?’” Funk recalled.

With few studios in town, she decided to “take a leap of faith” and create a yoga home for the Killeen community.

Funk will tell you, “If you can breathe, you can practice yoga,” and Life Moves Yoga strives to prove that every day with classes that allow variations to accommodate people with pain syndroms or injuries.

“The program can be motified and we offer gentle pose classes,” she said, adding they have chair yoga open to any age.

When she opened the studio, Funk had the mission to reach those who needed yoga within this military community.

“Which is why I was committed to putting something here near the gates of Fort Hood for easy access,” she explained. “I’ve been watching this for a long time; this has been my lifestyle.

“My husband has been on repeated deployments, I knew the need was here and I’m trying to meet it.”

But yoga isn’t for those who need an escape to relax from the stress of the day or relief from the pain. The studio offers Warrior Yoga, a class for those who currently serve and are looking for a different kind of strength.

“The mindfulness that comes with yoga — being able to take a step back, settle into your practice, have your own space — I think it’s so powerful for these people who have high speed jobs, physical stress, mental stress,” said Amanda Brown, studio manager and teacher at Life Moves Yoga. “I think it’s important for people to have a time and a space for themselves.”

Not only do the classes benefit those who serve but those who are here holding down their home front.

“We have a lot of people whose spouses are deployed, working as a single parent and they have all the stress of taking care of the family and doing everything on their own,” Brown explained. “They can come here and get deserved time for themselves, along with the community that comes with it.”

Funk’s overall goal is to use yoga to help as many people as possible, which is why her studio also offers yoga teacher training.

“We would love to be as involved as much as possible to reach greater needs in the community,” she explained.

Partnered with a fellow Army spouse from Fort Bragg, Funk trains those wanting to teach with the skills necessary to teach various forms of yoga.

“There’s a therapeutic training module to prepare teacher to work with everybody,” said Funk, “to modify and adapt with a portion of training with members with post-traumatic stress, pain syndrome.

“A big part of our mission is not just classes but teaching other to teach to further reach more people.”

Voting for the winning nicest place is now open at 10best.com/nicest and closes on July 7.

fcardenas@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7562

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