weather

A car splashes through an inundated street in Killeen after heavy rains on Monday.

After much of Killeen and surrounding areas were drenched with rain showers on Monday, meteorologists with the National Weather Service are predicting a 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms today.

Meteorologists expect “new rainfall amounts to be between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms,” according to the National Weather Service on Tuesday.

Tonight, folks can expect a 30 percent of showers and thunderstorms before 1 a.m.

On Wednesday, people might get more rain, with a 40 percent chance.

Killeen received an inch of rain on Monday, accordin

After much of Killeen and surrounding areas were drenched with rain showers on Monday, and another shower on Tuesday, meteorologists with the National Weather Service predicted a 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms on Wednesday .

Meteorologists expect “new rainfall amounts to be between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms,” according to the National Weather Service on Tuesday.

Killeen received an inch of rain on Monday, according to the National Weather Service rain gauge at Skylark Field.

Drought forecast

Bell County is listed in the “severe drought” category as of Aug. 28, before the recent rains, according to the National Integrated Drought Information System at drought.gov.

The U.S. Drought Monitor report that will be released later this week likely still will show Bell County still in “severe drought,” with perhaps part of the county in ‘extreme’ drought,” said Victor Murphy, Climate and COOP (Cooperative Observer Program) Services Program Manager in the Southern Plains region for the National Weather Service, on Tuesday.

“I’m very confident that Bell County will see a 1 to 2 category improvement in the next week’s drought report (the week of Sept. 10). This will put most of Bell County in ‘only’ moderate drought,” Murphy said.

The amount of rainfall during the week of Sept. 10 will determine the drought forecast.

“Another wet week of 1 to 2 inches of rain, which is possible, should do the trick,” Murphy said. “A widespread soaking of 3 to 6 inches over a two-week period would be enough to have Bell County out of drought by the end of September. At this point in time, this seems to be a plausible scenario.”

Tropical Storm Gordon is stirring up tropical moisture, affecting Central Texas, even though the storm is not expected to directly impact the Lone Star State.

“A stalled frontal boundary, with copious tropical moisture streaming into Central Texas ahead of Tropical Storm Gordon through the weekend, should go a long way toward mitigating the current severe to extreme drought across Bell County at this time,” Murphy said.

emilys@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7552

Emily Hilley-Sierzchula is reporter for the Killeen Daily Herald. Reach her at emilys@kdhnews.com

Herald reporter

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