• November 24, 2014

Tylenol gets new cap to curb overdoses

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Posted: Friday, August 30, 2013 4:30 am | Updated: 8:01 pm, Fri Sep 12, 2014.

WASHINGTON — Bottles of Tylenol sold in the U.S. will soon bear red warnings alerting users to the potentially fatal risks of taking too much of the popular pain reliever.

The unusual step, disclosed by the company that makes Tylenol, comes amid a growing number of lawsuits and pressure from the federal government that could have widespread ramifications for a medicine taken by millions of people every day.

Johnson & Johnson said the warning will appear on the cap of new bottles of Extra Strength Tylenol sold in the U.S. starting in October and on most other Tylenol bottles in coming months. The warning will make it explicitly clear that the over-the-counter drug contains acetaminophen, a pain-relieving ingredient that’s the nation’s leading cause of sudden liver failure.

“We’re always looking for ways to better communicate information to patients and consumers,” said Dr. Edwin Kuffner, vice president of McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the Johnson & Johnson unit that makes Tylenol.

overdoses send 55,000-80,000 to er

Overdoses from acetaminophen send 55,000 to 80,000 people to the emergency room in the U.S. each year and kill at least 500, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration. Acetaminophen can be found in more than 600 common over-the-counter and prescription products used by nearly one in four American adults every week, including household brands like Nyquil cold formula, Excedrin pain tablets and Sudafed sinus pills.

Tylenol is the first of these products to include such a warning label on the bottle cap. McNeil said the warning is a result of research into the misuse of Tylenol by consumers. The new cap message will read: “CONTAINS ACETAMINOPHEN” and “ALWAYS READ THE LABEL.”

The move comes at a critical time for the company, which faces more than 85 personal injury lawsuits in federal court that blame Tylenol for liver injuries and deaths. At the same time, the Food and Drug Administration is drafting long-awaited safety proposals that could curtail the use of Tylenol and other acetaminophen products.

Much is at stake for McNeil and its parent company. Johnson & Johnson does not report sales of Tylenol, but total sales of all over-the-counter medicines containing acetaminophen were more than $1.75 billion last year, according to Information Resources Inc., a retail data service.

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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2 comments:

  • texasgoat posted at 9:25 am on Fri, Aug 30, 2013.

    texasgoat Posts: 50

    This isn't fair to the spanish speaking and the illiterate!

     
  • wilcfry posted at 7:14 am on Fri, Aug 30, 2013.

    wilcfry Posts: 93

    "...the warning is a result of research into the misuse of Tylenol by consumers ... The ... the company ... faces more than 85 personal injury lawsuits in federal court that blame Tylenol for liver injuries and deaths."

    Am I missing something? Did any of those 85 people *accidentally* take too much Tylenol? My wife and my sister work in hospitals; both report that every overdose they've seen of over-the-counter medication was *intentional*. How can a company be responsible for this?