• September 17, 2014

Congress moving to ensure speedier care for veterans

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Posted: Wednesday, June 11, 2014 4:30 am

WASHINGTON — United in response to a national uproar, Congress is suddenly moving quickly to address military veterans’ long waits for care at VA hospitals.

The House unanimously approved legislation Tuesday to make it easier for patients enduring lengthy delays for initial visits to get VA-paid treatment from local doctors instead. The Senate was poised to vote on a similar bill within 48 hours, said Democratic leader Harry Reid.

The legislation comes close on the heels of a Veterans Affairs Department audit showing that more than 57,000 new applicants for care had to wait at least three months for initial appointments and an additional 64,000 newly enrolled vets who requested appointments never got them.

“I cannot state it strongly enough — this is a national disgrace,” said Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller, R-Fla., chief author of the House legislation.

Miller made his comments minutes before the House completed the first of two votes on its measure. Lawmakers approved the bill 421-0, then re-voted a little over an hour later, making sure no one was left out on the politically important vote, with five more in favor and no one against. Miller sheepishly admitted the reason for the second vote: He was in his office and missed the first tally.

The House bill and a similar version in the Senate would spend hundreds of millions of dollars to hire more doctors and nurses, but that may be easier said than done given a nationwide shortage of primary care physicians.

“This is not a problem that is just isolated to the VA,” said Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev. “It’s out there in the community.”

Primary care physicians are expected to become increasingly in demand as millions of people newly insured under the federal health care law start looking for regular doctors.

The Association of American Medical Colleges projected that by 2020, there will be 45,000 too few primary care physicians, as well as a shortage of 46,000 surgeons and specialists.

Shortages tend to be worse in both rural and inner-city areas.

Nevada already has a chronic shortage of doctors, both in primary care and among specialists, Titus said. The state ranks 46th among states and the District of Columbia for availability of general and family practitioners, she said, and 51st for surgeons.

While she voted for the bill, Titus said Congress and the Obama administration need to do more to ensure veterans receive care in the private sector.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., a chief author of the Senate measure, said he believed the Senate would approve the bill in the next day or two, adding it shouldn’t be hard for the two chambers to craft a compromise version.

The Senate bill would authorize the VA to lease 26 new health facilities in 17 states and Puerto Rico and spend $500 million to hire more doctors and nurses.

The House bill does not include a specific dollar amount, but Miller said the VA would save $400 million annually by eliminating bonuses, money the agency could use for expanded care.

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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1 comment:

  • Mamma Griz posted at 9:22 am on Wed, Jun 11, 2014.

    Mamma Griz Posts: 242

    It's about time! This is a case of better late than never. This mess has been going on for at least TEN years. Time for something good to happen for our veterans-- this could be Step 1, a starting point. Now to attract more primary care physicians-- in fact, more doctors of all type.

    Then while they are at it, hire more people to work on claims.

    And by the way, pay them-- male and female doctors as well as male and female claims personnel-- more than peanuts. And pay the females as much as you pay the males.