The Killeen City Council will discuss new state legislation regulating ride-sharing apps such as Uber and Lyft and a new ordinance governing city ground transportation at its workshop session Tuesday.

Gov. Greg Abbott signed House Bill 100 on May 29, washing away local regulations on ride-sharing apps and requiring companies to meet Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations permitting standards.

In Killeen, local cab companies repeatedly lobbied the council for greater enforcement of Uber, which has been in Killeen since summer 2015, and Lyft, which arrived in March.

With the state’s decision, local municipalities can no longer impose regulations on those companies but can still regulate ground transportation companies such as taxi and limousine services that operate under franchise agreements with the city.

A draft of the reworked ground transportation ordinance attached to the council agenda includes language on the state regulations, shuffles mandatory fare caps and includes franchisees in the text’s language.

Another change is stripping away regulations on “cruising” for fares, which would allow cab companies to look for passengers between assignments without reporting back to the garage.

In other business, the council will discuss a $338,400 contract with Freese & Nichols to develop the 2017 Water and Wastewater Master Plan.

The city’s last Water and Wastewater Plan was drafted in 2012, and all of a $20.2 million water and sewer bond issue to pay for projects in that plan has been used or allocated, according to a council memorandum.

The master plan is a comprehensive analysis of the city’s current infrastructure and a multi-year outlay of needed capital improvements and repairs. The analysis would include hydraulic model updates, system evaluation, capital improvement plans and advanced water modeling.

The council will also discuss two resolutions authorizing phase 10 of the city’s septic tank elimination projects at a cost of $118,340 and the rehabilitation of 5,130 feet of wastewater main lines at a cost of $655,570.

The 10th phase will bring city sewer to 101 homes in the Tucker Subdivision at 6000 S. Clear Creek Road.

The rehabilitation effort going before the council would allow Insituform Technologies to burst more than 5,000 feet of wastewater main. The city has already burst 1,892 feet of pipe as part of phase 3 of the sanitary sewer evaluation survey.

Pipe bursting involves running a pneumatic device through old lines to destroy the pipe from within and replace it with new lines.

The council’s workshop will begin at 5 p.m. Tuesday at the Utilities Collection Building, 210 W. Avenue C.

kyleb@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7567

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