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Early voting starts Monday in runoffs

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Jodi Perry/HERALD

A sign is seen on Farm-to-Market 2410 pointing to the Harker Heights City Hall announcing early voting.

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GATESVILLE — Early voting starts Monday for the May 27 Republican and Democratic primary runoff elections.

Democrats will pick their U.S. Senate nominee from runoff candidates David M. Alameel and Kesha Rogers. Their commissioner of agriculture nominee will be Jim Hogan or Richard “Kinky” Friedman.

Republicans will choose their general election candidates for lieutenant governor, incumbent David Dewhurst or Dan Patrick; attorney general, Dan Branch or Ken Paxton; commissioner of agriculture, Sid Miller or Tommy Merritt; and railroad commissioner, Wayne Christian or Ryan Sitton.

In a battle for the far-right core of their party’s primary voters, each GOP candidate has been trying to portray himself as more “conservative” than his opponent.

Democrats, meanwhile, are facing a “true or false” test of their candidates.

Alameel, a newcomer to the party, has been endorsed by Democrat leaders because Rogers, a follower of Lyndon LaRouche, has called for President Barack Obama’s impeachment.

Hogan, a Cleburne cattleman, is mounting a noncampaign against Friedman, a writer, musician and political prankster who also has run as a Republican and an independent for offices ranging from governor to justice of the peace.

If money is the “mother’s milk of politics,” Hogan seems to be lactose intolerant. Although Hogan shuns fundraising, speech-making and glad-handing, he finished first in the three-way primary.

Hogan stressed his agricultural background and said his bid for office is no joke.

“It would be easier for me to be a comedian than for Kinky to be a farmer,” Hogan said, “but I am not going to be telling jokes when I am elected.”

Hogan sees water as the most important issue facing Texas agriculture.

Friedman has come out in favor of legalizing marijuana and proposed the state generate money by trapping feral hogs and selling the animals for meat.

Trapping, processing and marketing of wild hogs for meat is currently done in the private sector under government regulation.

Contact Tim Orwig at torwig@kdhnews.com

1 image

Jodi Perry/HERALD

A sign is seen on Farm-to-Market 2410 pointing to the Harker Heights City Hall announcing early voting.

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