When Killeen begins its budgeting process in the coming months, city staff will look at the Killeen Public Library’s accreditation status, which was dropped in 2012.

The city chose to forgo renewing its state accreditation because the library found it to be of “minimal benefit,” said Hilary Shine, city spokeswoman. “The city selected to utilize its efforts and resources on quality services specific to the needs in our community.”

According to the Texas State Library and Archives Commission website, library accreditation includes the evaluation and rating of a public library. It also gives libraries access to databases and other resources worth more than $350,000.

Stacey Malek, program coordinator for the commission, said a library’s funding is not affected by its accreditation status.

“Accreditation allows libraries to be eligible for certain services from the state library,” she said. “It’s not a funding issue at all. (The majority) of funding for public libraries in Texas is from local government sources.”

Deanna Frazee, director of Killeen library services, said the city library system chose not to apply for accreditation because “it was not providing significant benefit to our patrons.”

Although the library isn’t accredited, it does meet state requirements.

“During the budgeting process, we compare the state accreditation requirements to our local standards and determine whether it would provide a benefit to our patrons to seek accreditation,” she said. “We have found that providing materials and resources specific to the needs in our community is far more beneficial to our patrons.”

Contact Natalie Stewart at nstewart@kdhnews.com or 254-501-7555

(1) comment

Alvin
Alvin

This too was brought up at last nights city council forum. The council candidates, when questioned, each denied any knowledge of the library and accreditation standards. The first question is 'why did the city elect to drop accreditation in the first place'. In the second place, to put a value on the information's worth, more than $350,000.00, is meaningless if a person does not wish the information.

In this article it is stated in one breath that the accreditation status 'was of minimal benefit', yet further down the article it states; “During the budgeting process, we compare the state accreditation requirements to our local standards and determine whether it would provide a benefit to our patrons to seek accreditation,” she said. “We have found that providing materials and resources specific to the needs in our community is far more beneficial to our patrons.”
The Texas State Library and Archives spokeswoman, a Stacy Malek said that a library's funding is not affected by its accreditation status, that accreditation allows libraries to be eligible for certain services from the State Library. Then she said 'It's not a funding issue at all'.
A Deanna Frazee, director of Killeen library services, said the city library system chose not to apply for accreditation because “it was not providing significant benefit to our patrons.”
Although the library isn’t accredited, it does meet state requirements.
So I ask – 1.) is there a cost for accreditation?, 2.) if so, what is the cost for accreditation, and 3.) is it felt that the monies that the city of Killeen will spend be of value.

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