Who's behind voting-machine makers? Money of unclear origins

In this Thursday, June 13, 2019 photo, ExpressVote XL voting machines are displayed during a demonstration at the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. The machines are made by Election Systems & Software, one of three voting-machine companies that disclosed to North Carolina election officials the substantial ownership stakes held by private equity firms

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The voting-machine makers that aim to sell their systems in North Carolina are largely owned by private equity firms that don't disclose their investors.

The companies didn't want the public to know even that much.

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