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Texas touts law protecting Christmas in public schools

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Posted: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 4:30 am

AUSTIN — Merry Christmas, bah humbug? Not in Texas.

Just in time for the holidays, Texas is making sure everyone remembers that wishing someone “Merry Christmas” is now protected by law in its public schools — and conservatives are hoping similar measures will gain momentum across America.

Garnering national attention when it was approved by the state Legislature this summer, the bipartisan law removes legal risks from exchanging holiday greetings in classrooms. It also protects symbols such as Christmas trees, menorahs or nativity scenes, as long as more than one religion is represented and a secular symbol such as a snowman is displayed.

“I’m proud to stand in defense of Christmas and I urge other states to stop a needless, stilted overreaction to Christmas and Hanukkah,” the law’s sponsor, Houston Republican Dwayne Bohac, said at a news conference Monday.

Bohac, who has a sign at home that proclaims: “Be Merry and Stay That Way,” said the law was meant to codify the religious freedoms of the First Amendment and keep “censorship of Christmas out of public schools.” He said it will stop “ridiculous” past lawsuits against some Texas schools in the name of excessive political correctness.

“This is a real issue in our country,” said Bohac, who said similar bills were filed in state Legislatures in Alabama, Mississippi, Indiana and New Jersey, and that one is coming in Oklahoma.

Texas is the only state to so far approve such a law, which some civil libertarians criticized as unnecessary given the First Amendment.

Bohac appeared Monday with his 8-year-old son Reagan and amid booming calls of “Ho! Ho! Ho!” from Santa Claus and a group called the Lone Star Santas. Bohac said Reagan inspired the bill when he was in first grade and was asked to decorate a “holiday tree” in class.

The law also states that schools are constitutionally barred from favoring one religious celebration over another, although it’s known as the “Merry Christmas Law.”

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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