• December 21, 2014

Water agreement will help city plan for its future, Killeen official says

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Posted: Sunday, September 29, 2013 4:30 am

A reclaimed water supply agreement between Killeen and Bell County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 gives the city the go-ahead to sell excess option water to a third party.

Scott Osburn, deputy city attorney, said rather than reaching an agreement with the district solely related to the initial project of using effluent to irrigate Stonetree Golf Club, city staff and WCID-1 “went down a path to reach a more system-wide approach.”

He said the agreement will aid the city in its efforts to plan for the future and it will allow master planning for projects with the potential to utilize reclaimed water.

Under the terms of the contract, the city will initially be allotted 2 million gallons of reuse water per day on a pay-a- used basis.

It also allots 8 million gallons per day of option water to the city.

Osburn said the 8 million gallons per day option water allows the city to “look forward to the future.”

The contract states the city can execute an agreement with a third party in the first two years of the agreement, whether to provide a service to an industry or an additional city facility.

The first two years of the agreement are a “delay period” so the city can form a master plan.

After the delay period, the district can market the option water to other entities. At that point, the city again would have the option to convert the option water to contract water and sell it as direct reuse water. The city would be given 90 days to decide before the district would gain control over the water to contract it out.

Once contracted out to a third party, the water would belong to the city for the terms of the agreement with the district.

The total allotment, 10 million gallons, is good, according to the terms of the contract, for 30 years, with two subsequent terms of 10 years.

The contract calls for the city to be responsible for operations and maintenance of the reuse facility.

Osburn said all operation costs are factored into the price the city will pay for reuse water — 18 cents to 19 cents per 1,000 gallons.

The reclaimed water project is expected to cost $950,000. It includes installing a pump and motors and connecting pipe to a line on Nolan Creek to a station at Roy Reynolds Drive. Potable water is being used to irrigate the golf course, which requires 400,000 to 500,000 gallons of water a day at 61 cents to 62 cents per 1,000 gallons. The move will not only free up potable water, but it also will save the city about $215 a day.

City Manager Glenn Morrison said what he likes most about the project is, “It puts that treated capacity back into our system.” The state commission on environmental quality must review the project proposal. Construction on the 38th Street water treatment plant, which is where the effluent will come from, is slated to begin after the first of the year.

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1 comment:

  • overseer posted at 1:40 pm on Mon, Sep 30, 2013.

    overseer Posts: 45

    Did anyone else notice this statement besides me? "The contract calls for the city to be responsible for operations and maintenance of the reuse facility." What does this mean?! The city is responsible for the operations and maintenance of the facility?! Now, I am no genius by a long-shot but, doesn't "operations" include staff and other overhead costs for the facility to function and be manned? Also, doesn't the word, "maintenance" mean that if anything breaks, whether it be caused by wear and tear or by the irresponsible actions of a particular worker or other staff member? I am not understanding this. We are paying a "COMPANY" to run THEIR facility AND charge us! THEN, if anything breaks and, or is damaged over the next 30 YEARS! WE have to pay to repair another "COMPANY'S" facilities?! I have one question - what in the world does WCID or, the "COMPANY" have to pay for? Whose facility is this anyway, the city's or theirs?