BERLIN (AP) — A quarter-century since his first foray into Germany's far-right movement, Andreas Kalbitz is poised to lead it to one of its biggest triumphs.

Kalbitz, 46, could be the big winner in next month's state elections in Brandenburg, where he heads the anti-migrant Alternative for Germany party. Yet he also is under scrutiny for his ties with far-right groups dating back to the early 1990s, when Germany saw a resurgence of nationalist sentiment amid post-unification turmoil.

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