The city of Killeen’s fiscal future is not looking any rosier now that the calendar page has turned to 2018.

At last week’s City Council meeting, City Manager Ron Olson told the council the city is staring at a shortfall of nearly $50 million in two decades — if nothing is done to change the current revenue and expenditure patterns.

That’s nearly double the $27.6 million figure Olson dropped on the council during last year’s budgeting process.

That’s because several necessary expenses were omitted from last May’s presentation — including mandatory HVAC replacements and underfunded recurring expenditures.

Employee pay is also lagging behind market norms, and the current budget doesn’t address that.

In recent years, the council and city staff have tried to trim expenses where possible, but the constant focus on bare-bones budgeting has put the city behind the 8-ball in several areas, including  street maintenance and building repairs.

In the next two decades 27 of the city’s 43 buildings will need new roofs.

Add that to the mandatory HVAC replacements, and we’re talking big money.

More importantly, the city is about $35 million behind in deferred street maintenance.

Back in 2013, a survey had recommended the city spend $1.8 million annually to address the backlog of needed roadwork. But that’s not exactly working out. In the current budget, the city has allocated just $300,000 — one-sixth the recommended sum.

That’s not going to get it done.

But where is the city going to get the money to make up the difference?

With sales tax growing at a meager 1.5 percent last month, property taxes impacted by the mandatory disabled veterans exemption (for which the state is inadequately reimbursing the city) and no stable auxiliary revenue streams such as developer impact fees or transportation utility fee, the council’s options are limited.

Olson told council members they need to revamp the way they consider recurring budget issues — especially in the area of employee retirement funding — or face some dire consequences.

The problem is, if the council can’t get a handle on the shortfall, the city’s budget problems will ultimately become the residents’ budget problems. Either residents will be paying more, or they’ll see a reduction in programs and services — or possibly both.

In the meantime, major projects still must be addressed.

On Tuesday, for example, Olson said the city is proposing a $30 million bond referendum in the spring to pay for two road projects in the area surrounding three new proposed Killeen ISD schools — including a fifth district high school. Those schools will be included in a proposed $426 million KISD bond issue that is likely to go before district voters on May 5.

Adding in the $30 million city bond, Killeen voters would be on the hook for more than $450 million in KISD and city bond debt if both initiatives are approved.

The city doesn’t have much choice but to propose a bond.

In addition to supporting the increased traffic to the new school facilities, city is contractually obligated to make infrastructure improvements in the area of the 3,700-home Bell County Municipal Utility District No. 2. Not so coincidentally, it is located on Chaparral Road — one of the two road projects paid for by the proposed bond issue.

But given the fact that the roads in the proposed bond are located in the southern portion of town, why should residents in the city’s northern sector support it?

Roads in some of the city’s older areas have fallen into disrepair, and despite the city’s best efforts at addressing these needs, funding has been lacking.

It’s easy to see how some north Killeen taxpayers might balk at throwing their tax money at a project that won’t directly benefit them.

Knowing that, it might be better if the council were to consider a larger bond package that would address street repair needs across a wider area of the community. It might cost more, but at least more taxpayers might support it.

In the short term, however, the council must identify the city’s top priorities — as Olson requested Tuesday — and work on a strategy to fund and implement them.

Council members made their choices.  

Building city infrastructure for the new district schools was near the top of the list.

Surprisingly, so was the issue of council protocol.

Granted, becoming better versed in council procedures may help members streamline meetings and be more productive.

But until the council can get a handle on how to prioritize spending and enhance revenue, better-run meetings won’t count for much.

dmiller@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7543

(6) comments

Alvin

This is the personal opinion of this writer.
@eyewatchingu: For the most part I agree with the analogies that you have posted here except for religion. I am a Christian and I don't make any bones about it. But everything else 'is open for discussion'.
Now regarding the notion that 'the contractual obligation' is just that, a contractual obligation, between an individual or individuals and what counts is: 'Money, Money, Money'.
What is a contract???? A contract is a promissory note that 'for a certain sum of money, you will agree to do what is in the contract that you say you are going to do'. Anything short of that contract, 'you can be held liable'. On the other hand, if you do not make the full commitment, of dollars, you can be held liable for the agreed upon sum of money that you agreed to pay'.
Now in regards to the 'contractual liability of this city in accordance with the contract to build what in essence is money that the city agrees to pay, now all of this was agreed to by the 4 council persons, the other 3 were just tag along' as it did not matter what they said, they were just an access baggage as this was a city council vote alone. There was another vote that was only allowed by the property's cousins, all 2 or 3 of them that was not for general population publication, or 'they were never allowed to vote on this amendment'.
Now I am in disagreement with the whole concept that 'a water company can be formed and a city is obligated to use that water company. The city holds a vote to accept that water company. If the vote is favorable, then the water company goes and entertains a bid to supply a city with the amount specified, 'on a contracted basis for a contracted amount of money. The amount so stipulated is agreed upon by a city council who then gives the city manager an 'authorization to sign a contract'.
Now up to this point, no money has changed hands, but that is about to change.
The water company then goes out and 'entertains bids to design and construct a water plant that is of a certain design and a certain volume of capacity to be finished on a certain date. If not, then 'they are in breach of contract'. Of course nothing is ever said by the water company or the engineering design engineer, they are just given the later dates as specified.
Now the contracted design, the contracted delivery date, and the contracted amount of water that is specified on the contract is a given. All of this time, the city bills the customer, the citizen who is duty bound to pay for this amount of water at a specified amount and it's delivered to the water company who then pays the Contractor/builder for 'delivery of services'. When the contractor/builder is complete in building the facility, it is turned over to the water company and the delivery of water is allowed to commence.
Now in all of that, the water company 'owns the equipment, and there is no ownership of the water until it flows through some sort of final metering station. You and I don't 'own any equipment that is used to purify the water, the water company owns all of the equipment and the contract that is signed for the delivery of the water. You get what the little boy shot at, 'Nothing', but you have to pay at least a minimal amount just for the use of the water mechanism itself.
Now a contract was let, in this case it was to the city of Killeen, Texas, to a specified water utility company, water supply company # 2, to supply water at a specified amount of 10 MGD, Millions of Gallons per Day, and it was specified to be delivered from Stillhouse Hollow Reservoir and delivered to the southern most region of the city limits, AKA the region that would be most advantageous to the region known as 'just outside of the Killeen city limits', or 'the region that the 3,750 homes are to be built'. Now to accomplish this, the city would be required to complete certain roadways of sufficient limits and the school board would be required to accommodate a certain size school for accommodation of these students.
How is all of this going to affect the citizen of Killeen by providing the money that is used for the supply and delivery of this associated water that the equipment does not belong to the citizens of Killeen, only the delivered water, but you get to pay for it to the tune of an original cost of $30 million, but it's climbing.
Now what does it have to do with me???? It's called, 'Money, money, money, money for the water company, and you get to pay for it.
Now the bit about 'contractual obligation', it is my understanding that the only 'contractual obligation' is for the benefit of the client, namely 'the water company who is 'in charge of' the water commitment and does not have anything to do with 'what the city is obligated to do to enforce a commitment to it's citizens'.
I am of the understanding that the $40 million plus is consistent with a contract that is for the benefit of peoples outside of this city's boundary, on county land, and does effect the citizen in as much as 'we get to pa for it', and as a result our roadways have been in a state of 'disrepair' so it does not make any sense, to this individual, to build a roadway that will cost $30 million plus for the convenience of somebody that does not pay taxes to this city. It's called 'Money, Money, Money' plain and simple.

And I believe that this council should be required to take any action that is to the benefit of it's citizens and not 'taken to the courts' as with this a matter of priority and for the betterment of it's citizens, the council should be engaged in the taking of a vote and the taking of this city's legal department in requesting that this be 'a matter of the council to request help from it's legal arm'.
Copy: '“As adamant as some are that the MUD is done, I’m equally adamant in the other direction,” Harris said.' End of copy.

I agree with this statement.

Copy: 'Among the proposed changes is the definition of a citizen. The definition would no longer be only a person who lives in the city of Killeen but also would include individuals who work in Killeen. Davis said this would allow them to address the council during the citizens' petitions and information items on the council's meeting agendas.' End of copy.

I do not agree with this interpretation. This is in conflict with an earlier interpretation that an individual who lives in Round Rock, Texas does not have the authority to post an email alluding to city services, so this should not be interpreted as having jurisdiction to include a city employee as a citizen. He only works here, he is not a citizen of this city. This should be addressed and corrected.

Copy: ' The council heard a briefing from Emergency Management Coordinator Chad Berg about the city's hazardous mitigation plan. The 260-page document was developed by the Central Texas Council of Governments and must be adopted for the city to continue to receive funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Department of Homeland Security.'
Condition of copy: 'The mitigation plan is designed to identify hazards that are most likely to have an adverse effect on the Central Texas region. Berg said the document will be available online later this week for council members to review.'


This is in reference to the new chemical plant that is proceeding with construction even tho there is a mitigation plan still being not authorized for publication. Again, this is putting the cart before the horse in the hopes that it will already be a done deal before the establishment date.
As for the other points of contention. The KEDC Board of Directors, the legal body of this city, and the city manager, I contend that this city council ruling that was brought about in 1990, that gave the KEDC a power that should been reserved for the city council, that gave the KEDC an opportunity to 'enter contractual opportunities without 'saving harmless' this city, that, as a money making venture, as noted with a profit margin of at least $1.5 million dollars on property that they own outright and not the city, and they have the opportunity to receive from this city upwards of $150,000 dollars per year, and the fact that with this arrangement, they can, in essence, go around the city council in open session thus negating the city council, the city manager as working in open session.
To be continued,
This has been the personal opinion of this writer and nothing shall be used, in context or without or changed in any way without first notifying, and receiving explicit approval from this writer.
One of the 4.58 % who voted.

eyewatchingu

@Alvin, I also think that North Dist. 1 would be much better off seceding from Killeen and becoming its owns city with in a city, since the city of Killeen see's dist. one as a burden and a drain on them.
This would open this part of Dist 1 up, and could be built back up. Norh Killeen would be then entitled to the same state benefits and so on, from sells taxes and so. We could open the PD back here, have our own FD, apply our own tax rates and so on. If a city with in a city can be built outside of a city, ( which means its truly is not a city with in a city because it is not with in the city) then Dist.1 could become a true city with in a city.
If Fleming wasn't banking off these deals she would have stood up a long time ago for this dist. Instead she is just a distraction to look like she is against stuff or didn't know about the plant.
The people should wake up and take a true look at these leaders and actually listen to what they are saying, and you can actually see it.

eyewatchingu

@Alvin I agree with you as well on the water.

These two quotes summed up what I feel is wrong with our city. To many sitting councilmen and women along with our mayor will profit off this 3,700 homes being built.

The first quote pretty much says it all, with the last sentence.

" things like trucking services."
Now if we step back and look at each of those sitting on city council including the Mayor on up to both 55, and 54 dist seats, we can see that each one has some type of chance to make money off these types of deals. Fleming trucking, those that have any dealings with the construction company, the central air, then those that will sell the homes and lets not forget those Churches that those leaders belong to. Don't forget these churches have the belief if you pay your tithe the pearly gates will open wide. Tithe is paying 10% or more of your earnings to the church. ( btw, the biggest church is built by God himself, just walk outside and look up, jeeze if we all put 10% of earnings into God's church wow, how amazing his church truly could be)
So in all fairness, the pattern here would lead any normal human person with a mind, to see that this is only for the profit of a select few in Killeen tx.
(The quote I am talking about.
Nationally, about 41 percent of the cost of residential repair goes to labor. For new construction, that number is just 28 percent, meaning considerably more than half of any investment in a new home goes not to construction jobs, but to materials, equipment and things like trucking services.)

Next quote: “Unfortunately, the real estate industry isn’t really designed that way,” says Uwe Brandes, ULI’s vice president for initiatives. “In so many different ways, the real estate industry is designed to produce new buildings, and so recapitalizing old buildings, especially in a state-of-the-art way, is not something that collectively we’re particularly good at.”

Now if we break this quote down, and this is quote came from someone top in the field of real Estate and is very highly regarded amongst the peers in the real estate business.
He also sums it up in the last sentences.
“In so many different ways, the real estate industry is designed to produce new buildings, and so recapitalizing old buildings, especially in a state-of-the-art way, is not something that collectively we’re particularly good at.”

The real Estate Business, and those that are running them, are simply out to build new, because it is more profitable for them.

So why in the world, are we allowing these Kings and queens to sit in seats and bank off of us, worst part is, the same people fall for their song and dance, because they are being made promises of profit if they vote for them.

@Alvin If you get a chance pick up the news candidate book for the Mayors and city council race. If you have an old one ( I had to hunt one down) You can see how the regulations, codes and so on have changed to benefit these types of candidates.

Yes, you can get out of those types of contracts very easily. Actually that type is much easier to get out of then most. Yes it may be a small cost to the city as long as the city can prove that the contract could have detrimental impact on the citizens! I also believe that if the citizens get together they could also form a lawsuit against the city. Reason I say this, is these two bonds are going to cause many to loses their homes, end up with higher rent and forced to move ( and many will not have money to do this and may end up homeless) this also can and will lead to finical stress due to a tax burden on a person, which can cause a increase in domestic violence, increase in suicide do to financial stress, and a up take in gangs, violent crimes, property crimes, thief and much more in the dist. Like dist 1 that is already falling between the cracks, which in turn will cost the small business owner a finical lost, because the people will spend less, we will see many small business lost. This why the NAACP and the hate group BLM call for only shopping black owned stores. Because it will be in some areas the black community will take the biggest hit, as the black owned stores usually are already struggling. ( I am far from a racist, I just don't like any org or group that promotes one race, I just personally have seen the worst in theses types of groups, from the KKK to the BLM, sadly the NAACP has way to many in it that chooses to feed off those that they were meant to help and protect.)
This is a time when we can't afford a divide in the citizens, this is when we should all work together and put pressure on the city council, by aligning ourselves and finding an attorney that has the PLATNUIM BALLS ( I just like platinum over brass. ) That is willing to take on Killeens queens and Kings and the corrupt system we have.. I think the best way to do it would simply find a attorney out of state that can practice here, and have this appear in front of a court somewhere away from Killeen.
This also should be done with the Chemical plant as well. As this plant will hurt the citizens of Dist 1. As I have showed and posted Texas state regulation 211 and you can clear violations.

My personal opinion is that this city has allowed the ricco laws to be violate time and time again for self profit and gain. Our city leaders past and present have ran our city as racketeering enterprise.

At no time has this city council applied empathy to their citizens, and have in my opinion caused undue mental stress on the city as a whole. ( finical stress is mental stress).
As for any of them to sit and say they are a good Christian, well shame on them.
Just remember what the bible says about leaders like we have. I find them to be Hypocrite Christians. The bible says God helps those who help themselves, this didn't mean help your self the money of the poor and improvised, it don't mean to make money off the people you lead. This only makes them to be like the Pharos we as Christians escaped from.

I truly hope that neither bond passes, as I fear we will lose many good people in our city that has made homes here and contributed for years. Dist. 1 will take the hardest hit, and the vacant homes and foreclosures will increase along with violent crimes and suicides

Like you Alvin this is just my personal opinion and like you, I am just a citizen of Killeen treated like the city leaders own personal financial slave!

Alvin

This is the personal opinion of this writer.
@eyewatchingu: 'Doing pretty good, just wondering why this corporate bunch of the city administration keeps saying, 'we are contractually obligated to the makings of infrastructure improvements in the area of the 3,750 homes which comprise Bell County Municipal Utility District No. 2 for there we are being asked to shell out almost $460 million dollars for the new roads when we are in essence, abandoning all of our roadways in Killeen. Looks like we will be going back to dirt roads. Better keep up the motor graders and bulldozers for we are going to have a lot of work for them.
This operation tends to say that 'we are contractually obligated'. They haven't heard of contractually closing a contract as non essential to the city for if we do not get these $460 million dollars in bonds, we are sure to have a housing development that will not have the schools or roadways necessary to transport these people on, it will be the dirt road concept just like the rest of Killeen is coming to.
Not only are we going to have wholesale land available for parks that does nothing , we are going to have to pay a maintenance fee for a bunch of empty land, and that also.
Yes, I am amazed at this town that throws caution to the wind and says, 'we re going to build these 3,750 homes, build roadways to support the traffic that is intended, and we will need to educate those children. But in the meantime, this town is forcing on us the chore of funneling all of our resources into the South section of town as that's where the 'new city center is going to be built'. So take out your check books for it is going to be a run on city taxes whatever the cost, it's going to happen.

Well I say, no to the city's burnt offerings, no to the school district, and no to any other item that comes along for I'm certain that if this city votes down the current roadbuilding, and votes down the current school bond, this will stalemate the 3,750 homes that are to be constructed so 'why do we need the 10 MGD water plant' so it should be shelved too. Take another look at the water system and develop another means of getting water from one of the other water districts. I'm quite sure that the other water districts would be willing to sell us some water and if worse comes to worse, this city can look into water reclamation or recycling, just put in a test plant and we'll build from there.
There's no such thing as 'contractually obligated'. Jut look at the early 1970' when the oil embargo hit, my company 'shelved $5 Billion dollars worth of power plant construction in one week, so there is no such animal as ''contractually obligated'. It may cost this city some money but 'it can be done' and would save this city money.
And @eyewatchingu: 'I agree with what have said'.
This has been the personal opinion of this writer and nothing shall be used, in context or without or changed in any way without first notifying, and receiving explicit approval from this writer.
One of the 4.58 % who voted.

eyewatchingu

@Alvin, Hi how are you doing?

Growth inside military gates can mean growth outside the gates. Jobs may expand in construction, retail, health care, and hospitality. But the economic effects are likely to be larger in locations where there’s already a healthy mix of professional positions in scientific research and development and engineering.

Military installations can benefit communities, especially posts that import the equivalent of a corporate headquarters, with highly paid jobs — engineers, scientists, professionals, and high-level managers. Those locales see more of a boost than ones with bases that only process and train troops.

Military spending stimulates personal income growth in states with higher manufacturing, and in those that already receive a large share of military prime contracts.

The benefits of military spending are unlikely to be as great in isolated areas, where there may be only troop related activities. In those cases, the military bases may be more self-contained. It’s easier to keep everything on post. The spillover is only some retail spending. There isn’t a whole lot that goes back into the local economy.


This part is a quote : Like many industries such as steel production, mining, and automobile manufacturing, military facilities are highly concentrated in a few geographic areas. Of the thousands of local labor markets around the country, there are only about 30 in which the armed services play a disproportionate role in the local economy. In some of these communities, however, a military installation is a dominant economic feature, recalling for some the image of the early 20th-century company town. In Killeen, Texas; Virginia Beach, Va.; and Jacksonville, N.C., for example, more than 15 percent of all employed people are in the active-duty armed forces. What difference does this military presence make to a community? Cities with a large military presence are among the least racially segregated in the United States, according to a study by demographers Reynolds Farley and William Frey.1 Among the least-segregated areas were Anchorage, Alaska; Clarksville, Tenn.; Fayetteville, N.C.; Jacksonville, N.C.; Lawton, Okla.; Cheyenne, Wyo.; Fort Walton Beach, Fla.; Honolulu, Hawaii; and Tucson, Ariz. All of these areas have a large military presence. Labor markets with a large military presence not only have less residential segregation, but also less racial segregation in employment. Sociologist Seth Ovadia found that the military presence softened or eliminated the effects of race on both the employment odds for black men and on the racial gap in quality of employment.

The military-dominated labor markets are not as favorable for women’s employment, however. A study by sociologist Bradford Booth and colleagues found that the unemployment rates were higher for women in areas of high military presence than among other areas in the United States—7.9 percent compared with 6.6 percent.3 Moreover, women employed in labor markets characterized by high military presence earned on average about $700 less annually than their counterparts employed elsewhere. In general, women in the labor force in areas with a high military presence were more likely to be unemployed, were likely to earn less, and were likely to get lower returns to human capital than were women in other labor markets in the United States.

37 percent of military personnel moved to a new residence, compared with 15 percent of civilians.

But among all the reasons why cities should pour resources into retrofitting and repairing the housing stock they already have, here's one more: Residential redevelopment creates more jobs than new construction does. And it’s a safe bet that any city that has an aging, vacant or foreclosed housing problem right now has a jobs problem to go with it.
Rehabilitating them is considerably less wasteful – and more realistic – than replacing them all together. And the economy won’t support much new construction these days anyway.
Rehabilitating old buildings is more labor-intensive than new construction, since much of the cost of new construction goes literally to bricks and mortar.
Repairing existing residential buildings produces about 50 percent more jobs than building new ones.
Nationally, about 41 percent of the cost of residential repair goes to labor. For new construction, that number is just 28 percent, meaning considerably more than half of any investment in a new home goes not to construction jobs, but to materials, equipment and things like trucking services.

quote: “Unfortunately, the real estate industry isn’t really designed that way,” says Uwe Brandes, ULI’s vice president for initiatives. “In so many different ways, the real estate industry is designed to produce new buildings, and so recapitalizing old buildings, especially in a state-of-the-art way, is not something that collectively we’re particularly good at.”

Alvin

This is the personal opinion of this writer.

Copy: 'The city of Killeen’s fiscal future is not looking any rosier now that the calendar page has turned to 2018.' End of copy.

Well we are still on the kick, 'the sky's falling, the sky's falling'. Yes the sky is falling but this city manager, and this 4 member majority of of the total of 7 council members cannot see the numbers in front of their faces, except 'raise taxes, get another bond for many hundred's of millions of dollars'.

Why???? What is it going to take to get this city's administrative group to 'tell it like it is', that we are many millions of dollars in the 'RED' because our city government cannot see beyond their pipe dreams???? We've gotten ourselves in this stew because in our city charter in which there is a city manager/council form of government, and 'many of this bunch can't see their noses in front of their faces'. They see a pipe dream of 3,750 new homes to be built that will take an enormous sum of money to accomplish that this city does not have. They do not see that this city does not have the means to support a 'new water plant to the tune of $30 million dollars and has exponentially gone right on through this figure with the 'planned' increase in elevated water tank size, pimping manifold and piping, and the pumps themselves, not to mention whatever else is going to come up. They do not see that this city does not have the means to support a $426 million dollar school educational expansion program nor the means to support the $30 million dollar roadway that it will take to bring all of this about.

And in all of this:

Copy: 'In the next two decades 27 of the city’s 43 buildings will need new roofs.
Add that to the mandatory HVAC replacements, and we’re talking big money.'
Continuation of copy: 'More importantly, the city is about $35 million behind in deferred street maintenance.'
Continuation of copy: 'Back in 2013, a survey had recommended the city spend $1.8 million annually to address the backlog of needed roadwork. But that’s not exactly working out. In the current budget, the city has allocated just $300,000 — one-sixth the recommended sum. End of copy.
Where did this city think it was all going to come from???? Yes, where is it going to come from???? Not on the backs of individual citizens for we don't have the funds to carry our load at this present time much less any increased indebtedness.
This city administrative group just keeps on 'putting it off' with the thought that 'maybe next year'. Well it's came to the realization that 'this is the year that it all comes to a head' and it will come as no surprise that 'this city just cannot maintain the ' growth be dam*ed' pace that is facing this city now.
First, in my personal opinion, this city's growth pattern, all in a Southerly direction, is not good for this city. When you get 3,750 homes to be built to the south in a rather short period of time, that is just outside of the city limits, and this growth pattern causes this city to have to build a new high school, $171 million, with a $426 million dollar ultimate cost and new enlarged roadway, now $30 million down from $41.6 million, when this city cannot even maintain the roadways it has now, and it's all caused by a growth pattern of centralization in the southern quadrant rather than uniformly growth in all quadrants of this city so that it is spread out throughout the city thus slowing the increase on roadways and school districts to a more uniform pace.

The sales tax figures do not show that this city can support itself by a growth factor of just 1.5 percent for the last month.
The property tax were impacted by the mandatory disabled veterans exemption, but 'what if we did not have that military installation in the first place???? We would not have the millions of dollars that this military installation is supplying and the need to 'build 3,750 homes in the southern part of this city would be null and void'.
The importance of 'auxiliary revenue streams' are blown out of proportion by the fact that 'this is a one time fee, but the maintenance costs goes on forever' thus negating the value of the fee in the first place.
With sales tax growing at a meager 1.5 percent last month, property taxes impacted by the mandatory disabled veterans exemption (for which the state is inadequately reimbursing the city) and no stable auxiliary revenue streams such as developer impact fees or transportation utility fee, the council’s options are limited.
Olson told council members they need to revamp the way they consider recurring budget issues — especially in the area of employee retirement funding — or face some dire consequences.
The problem is, if the council can’t get a handle on the shortfall, the city’s budget problems will ultimately become the residents’ budget problems. Either residents will be paying more, or they’ll see a reduction in programs and services — or possibly both.

That, in my opinion, is not an answer. To say that this city cannot sustain itself with the money that is currently coming in, 'is a dooms day approach to the city's financial picture'. And conversely to say that 'unless we 'throw open the gates to unparalleled funding 'we just as well open our pockets and purses and say, 'how do you require at this time'???? It will be a never ending pull on the pockets of every citizen of this city.

In the case of this city back in 2013 saying it would take at least $1.8 million annually to address the backlog of needed roadwork, and this year the city has allocated one sixth of that amount, $300,000 dollars, nowhere the amount needed to at a minimum sustain the roadways, and it's been that way ever since.

Copy: 'In the next two decades 27 of the city’s 43 buildings will need new roofs.'
Continuation of copy: 'Add that to the mandatory HVAC replacements, and we’re talking big money.'
Continuation of copy: 'More importantly, the city is about $35 million behind in deferred street maintenance.' End of copy.

Why did this city 'allow itself to get in this condition'????
Copy: 'The city doesn’t have much choice but to propose a bond.'
Continuation of copy: 'In addition to supporting the increased traffic to the new school facilities, city is contractually obligated to make infrastructure improvements in the area of the 3,700-home Bell County Municipal Utility District No. 2. Not so coincidentally, it is located on Chaparral Road — one of the two road projects paid for by the proposed bond issue.' End of copy.

I disagree with the premise 'that this city is contractually obligated to make the 3,750 home Bell County Municipal Utility District No. 2'. There is 'not' a circumstance wherein this water district can force to conclusion this project. Company's are 'getting out of their contracts almost everyday for various reasons.

The city will not grow to the growth that is stated, but this city will not 'go to the poor house either'.
We need to get this council, and that is determined by what the city manager tells the council as to 'what is the best solution to end this city's money woes'. This city manager cannot say that the only conclusion to this mess that has gotten this city into the financial woes is 'to continue to build everything that has been promised'. The contracts can be closed. The city and school district does not have to continue with the 'build, build, build scenario that is currently being expressed by certain members of this council.
I am still of the opinion that as far as this city's bonds and as far as this school districts bonds are concerned, I will cast a no vote on any measure that has to do with the city's obligations to support these adventures. Why doesn't this city and this school district support the 'no support' of these bonds and 'save that maney in the first place'​​​​????

This has been the personal opinion of this writer and nothing shall be used, in context or without or changed in any way without first notifying, and receiving explicit approval from this writer.
One of the 4.58 % who voted.

Welcome to the discussion.

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