• September 19, 2014

Differing with president’s policies does not make someone a racist

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Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2013 4:30 am

To the Editor:

Recently, in discussion with old friends about the current “State of The Nation,” it quickly became obvious not everyone  agreed about how we got to our present position.

Even more perplexing was whether our present national situation was good or bad, or even if we are getting better or worse.

Naturally, different opinions are to be expected among people with diverse backgrounds and life experiences, but what was not expected was the insinuation that if I and others had opinions different from those of the president or the majority of the voting public, we were prejudiced. 

Having spent 30-plus years in the military, and 15 years in the workplace, I have long come to grips with my preconceived notions about other races and how they may differ in attitudes, behaviors and customs from mine. 

I made no value judgment as to who was right or wrong as long as they did not allow those inherent behaviors to supersede the rules, regulations and values of the military or workplace.

The rules of the military and workplace constituted conditions of employment that everyone accepted up-front.  

I make no apologies for my political leanings because I think I am correct, and the opposition is wrong, but, I respect your right to differ.

You may vote for a politician or a straight-line vote for a political party, and I may still have enough in common with you to call you a friend.

The one thing that I don’t do is insist that you vote for a person because of race, creed or color.

For you to insist that a person vote for a candidate who is of one ethnic group, is to say that group has surrendered its freedom of thought and purpose to their skin pigmentation, and that is wrong.

Don Fender

Killeen

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4 comments:

  • Concerned Vet posted at 7:35 am on Fri, Feb 22, 2013.

    Concerned Vet Posts: 3

    Racism is alive and well, and until recently it resided just under the surface. Go back to Obama's first election win, and we saw the first black man elected to the office of President in the history of our country. I'm proud to be an American in this day and age where we can say we have risen to the point we have in our relations with one another. I did not vote for him either time, because I am an independent conservative, and his views and beliefe are not shared by me. Fast forward to this latest election, racism had reared its ugly head again and again. There is racist remarks on both sides to be fair, but the majority I have experienced has been on the side of black American's & white Americans against those that oppose Obama. The liberals have thrown up the race card more times than I can count, and it's getting a little old, and downright sickening. This Veteran, and conservative caucasion American refuses to walk on eggshells any longer for fear of upsetting a person of another race or beliefs that are different than mine. Youtube, and social networking sites are full of examples where peopel have come right out and stated they voted for Obama because he is black. Yes most of them saying so are black themselves. I've said since 2008 that there is no way Obama won simply based on his views or platform.. Color of skin played a huge role, and quite honestly anybody that cannot recognize or admit that fact is only lying to themselves. Is that totally wrong? If I were a black person I would say no. As a caucasion, I say people voting for a person of their same color isn't nearly as bad as Americans refusing to acknowledge the fact. What's bad is people not taking time to educate themselves on current issues, the state of our Union, and where we stand as a country these days. The fact that we reelected one of the worst Presidents, with the worst record in office in recent history, and the fact that it happened largely in part due to his skin color.... that is what troubles me. I don't buy into what the doomsday extremists are saying... that this President is going to ruin our country. I have more faith in our country, our people, and our resolve than to believe all that noise. Do I think we have problems? You bet I do. But, voters better start to wake up, and pay attention to current events, and what is going on in their local communities, their state, and our country...and then apply that knowledge when it comes time to vote. Have an opinion, and vote smart. We can't afford for people to keep on voting based on color, popularity, or anything but how a particular candidate stands on any given issue.We need to get passed the color issue, and get to work to fix what is wrong with this country. [sad]

     
  • sammisj posted at 12:29 pm on Tue, Feb 19, 2013.

    sammisj Posts: 5

    I have no doubt that Don Fender is not prejudiced in any manner - but that does not mean that some of Obama's detractors are not - I have heard several comments from veterans - some of them officers that graphically racist that are nothing less than racial slurs - again just because you don't like Obama's policies does not mean that you are a racist - however comments that are graphically racist do

     
  • Pete posted at 8:59 am on Sun, Feb 17, 2013.

    Pete Posts: 116

    Wow. This liberal - conservative divide is a diversion from the real threat - multinational corporate greed - (globalism) and the reduction of America's middle class standard of living. Tweedle Dee (Democrat) or Tweedle Dum (Repbulican) doesn't really matter to the corporate puppet masters who have the real control through campaign election/funding laws. To return power to the people, campaigns need to be publically financed! The public pays for them anyway through the cost of goods and services. Public payment for campaigns through transparent funding (which could also break the strangle hold of the two party tradition) will make politicians beholden to the people not the multinational corporations (always follow the money).

     
  • Bubba posted at 8:13 am on Sun, Feb 17, 2013.

    Bubba Posts: 695

    liberals immediately throw the race card and used it effectively in two elections to get the wrong man in office.