• July 31, 2014

Study in Australia to determine if testosterone could help fight diabetes in baby boomer men

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Monday, April 8, 2013 4:30 am

TOKYO — When Gary Wittert began looking for tubby male baby boomers to take part in a clinical trial last month, he got 800 volunteers in one day. The draw: free testosterone injections.

Wittert, a professor of medicine at the University of Adelaide, and his colleagues suspect the sex hormone known to increase libido and musculature could also help prevent a form of diabetes that tends to strike later in life and afflicts more than 330 million people worldwide.

The steroid, which cyclist Lance Armstrong admitted to using in winning seven Tour de France titles, could go from being popular among men “looking to spice up their sex lives” to becoming a mainstream therapy if the trial, the largest test of testosterone’s potential to fight diabetes, shows positive results, said Stuart Roberts, a health care analyst with Bell Potter Securities in Sydney.

“The Wittert study will be the real kicker here,” Roberts said in a telephone interview. “This is what gets you away from the ‘snigger factor’ with testosterone. And, because testosterone is cheap and easy to make, it won’t be an impost to the health care system.”

Although diabetes and obesity are linked to testosterone deficiency, scientists don’t know what effect testosterone has on diabetes risk for men whose waning sensitivity to insulin makes them prediabetic.

Trial participants will be monitored for blood sugar, muscle strength, body composition, and their motivation to stick with a lifestyle program, Wittert said.

“It’s going to be big undertaking, but we will get an answer,” said the University of Sydney’s David Handelsman, whose ANZAC Research Institute is one of six sites in Australia involved in the research. “No other study of that scale and ambition is underway anywhere in the world to my knowledge.”

Current recommendations to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes focus on reducing body fat and exercising, which fails to stop as much as 30 percent of those at risk of the obesity-linked condition developing it within five years. The International Diabetes Federation said the disease costs $471 billion to treat worldwide.

Rules of Conduct

  • 1 Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
  • 2 Don't Threaten or Abuse. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated. AND PLEASE TURN OFF CAPS LOCK.
  • 3 Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
  • 4 Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
  • 5 Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
  • 6 Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.

Welcome to the discussion.

KDH Poll

Loading…
Pot was destined for ‘Fort Hood area,’ 3 suspects say
Posted: July 30, 2014

McLennan County sheriff’s deputies arrested three men Monday night who they believe were attempting to transport drugs to Killeen and Fort Hood.

more »
Fort Hood officials to close House Creek Bridge on West Range Road
Posted: July 30, 2014

FORT HOOD — The installation will close House Creek Bridge on West Range Road at 7 a.m. today to ensure public safety after engineers found major structural issues with the bridge, post officials said Tuesday.

more »