Halloween Hoopla

Korleia Wright, 2, is seen dressed as a witch during Halloween activities at the Killeen Special Events Center on Friday, Oct. 31, 2014.

The city of Killeen has drawn criticism after its Monday announcement to move trick-or-treating to Oct. 30, one day before the scary holiday.

“Halloween is on Sunday, Oct. 31, but the City has reserved Saturday, Oct. 30 for trick-or-treaters and for those who would like to pass out candy or treats. As a reminder, children should always be accompanied by an adult,” a news release said Monday.

However, a lot of initial online reactions to the message has not been positive.

“I understand doing city wide events on the Saturday, but trick or treating should definitely be on the 31st. It’s usually that way even when it falls on a weekday. Why change it?” said Facebook user Cecilia Villa, responding to the news release.

“I don’t get changing the day instead of the time frame of trick or treating so that way they can do it earlier like they do when it’s during the week days.. Unless they are saying it’s for religious reasons, then it should be a personal choice, not something determined by a city,” said Elizabeth Ramirez-Boothe, another user.

However, Killeen spokeswoman Janell Ford gave the following explanation.

“There were a few reasons that went into the recommendation. Many citizens reserve Sunday for religious and family activities, and also the Saturday option provides parents the advantage of avoiding Trick-or-Treating on a ‘school night,’ that can include rushing and/or restricted time frames,” Ford said Tuesday.

Ford added that the Killeen community has been generally receptive to the idea.

“We’ve received a lot of positive feedback from the community on the decision, although we acknowledge the decision may not accommodate everyone’s preference. This is the City’s recommendation, and we hope everyone enjoys a safe and healthy Halloween.”

Killeen is not the first city to try moving the night of trick-or-treating when Halloween falls on a Sunday.

“Across the country, people are monkeying with the optimal day to dress up. In some cities, residents have decided to celebrate Halloween on Saturday to preserve the purity of the Christian Sabbath,” according to a Oct. 28, 2010, article in The New York Times. Halloween also fell on a Sunday during that year.

In the Times’ article, officials also said they wanted to move trick-or-treating from Sunday to Saturday so it would not fall on a school night.

Killeen city officials have recommended that residents follow these guidelines.

Trick-or-Treaters:

Stay home if you or any member of your group is sick

Wear a cloth mask (costume masks are not appropriate substitutes for protective masks)

Keep at least six feet of distance at all times; avoid parties, encourage small groups

Remain outdoors

Observe good hygiene by using hand sanitizer and washing hands

Wash hands and inspect candy before enjoying

Participating Houses/Venues:

Do not participate if you or any member of your household is sick

Wear a cloth mask when interacting with trick-or-treaters

Keep at last six feet of distance from trick-or-treaters

Keep all activities outdoors

Wash hands frequently when preparing treats and before and after delivering them

Consider contactless delivery, by pre-packaging treats and setting them out to grab

jdowling@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7552

(9) comments

Perun

I believe in the respect of others and although for many people call this holiday pagan, others do not see it that way due to different historical interpretations, but depending on whether the holiday is pagan or not, no one has the right to tell the other when they celebrate the festival of their religion. If this is a religious cult for some, then this proposal is against freedom of worship.

Killeen patriot

I cannot believe so many people are bent out of shape about what day you do trick-or-treating. I mean how petty are we as a society. What is really idiotic is the person who mentioned the constitution in their post in regards to trick-or-treating. I challenge anyone to show me where in the constitution the founders protected trick-or-treating to be on Oct 31. I for one as a parent love not having trick-or-treating on a school night. As for religious reasons, I love when Halloween is on Sunday. It gives me a chance to hand out tracks explaining the pagan roots and in the process tell them about the love of Christ. Basically, people need to grow up.

Hacksaw

I can remember a time when people had enough sense to decide, for themselves, what was best for their family. Whether or not to Trick or Treat on a school night was the decision of parents. Not a city government.

I don't see where it's any of the governments business when people participate in Halloween activities.

We always used the rule, in my neighborhood, if you were participating turn your porch light on, if not leave it turned off. Been working fine for about the past 35 years for us!

Noneofyourbiz

With

No one 🕜 n the pagan community was made swear that the city of Killeen was going to determine the date of one of our holidays, nor is it the right of any christian to demand another religion to change thier holiday to fit into thiers.

Halloween was and belongs to many other religions way before christians took it.

Halloween was and still is a sabbath day for many religions.

This city council seems to have no self control when it comes to trampling on our constitutional rights.

The act of knocking on doors and passing out treats was before Christianity times. Christians changed the celebration to fit thier needs.

Just like the bible says it is forbidden for a Christian to adorn a Christmas tree, yet the pagan tradition has found its way into the christian homes.

If you choose to trample on others traditions, please feel free to stop decorating Christmas trees and follow the true meaning of your Christmas, which would mean not passing out gifts, the pagan Santa Claus would no longer visit, no kissing under the miseltoe or adorning your house with ivy as the ivy king and Holly king are a pagan tradition and one should only celebrate the birth of Christ.

Stop trampling on people's rights, stop forcing your personal beliefs on others, it is unconstitutional and I am sure someone will fight this in the court system once some of the other national pagan leaders hear about it.

Alvin

This is not a Holiday, it is an observance that we attend to each and every year. Do you want to make this the same as say Christmas, or the 4th of July, Veterans day, etc. So go ahead mayor and write your proclamation and get your city council to sign it and lets be done with the silliness once and for all.

chcknhawk

I highly doubt the city has received many favorable comments about this decision. Did KDH ask to see the proof? I've seen maybe 1/50 who think changing the day is a good idea.

Noneofyourbiz

I would like to see that proof as well. I wasn't even swear this was to take place, nor swear of any public information or public hearing.

I want to know who starred the conversation, where city leaders talked about this publicly and much more.

I want to see the documents, minutes and emails . Maybe we should do an open record request.

don76550

This is an event the city council clowns need to stay away from.

Noneofyourbiz

They r just stepping all over the constitution and religious freedoms.

I don't trust them, and I think I will not trust them every again.

Do nothing and sit there is what they think we will do. Not when they are going after the freedoms of others in hopes of getting the christian pastors and christian voters to vote for them and donate.

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