A Killeen native who has graduated at the top of his class in multiple schools, has dedicated a lot of his time in recent years to understanding intercultural relations, and he said his studies are connected to black history.

Eric Gaither, a contracted researcher has also worked as a researcher at the Gerald R. Ford Library in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he has conducted research about the impact of the Self-Determination Act under the Ford administration on Native Americans and African American freedmen.

The act gave tribes power to exercise their own sovereignty and “control their own affairs,” according to the National Library of Medicine.

Gaither has also been studying different languages that he said he calls “American heritage languages.”

Most recently, Gaither has learned Czech, through Blinn College in Schulenburg, and Cherokee from the Cherokee Nation Learning Center in Talequah, Oklahoma.

Gaither said his studies connect to black history, because in the Jim Crow era, many people groups, such as Italians, Asians and Czechs, were considered black. Because of that classification for those groups, Gaither said many of them mingled and associated themselves with African Americans.

“Being mindful of the historical context in which Black History Month emerged is central to understanding and appreciating its significance,” Gaither said.

Gaither said that the one key figure to Black History Month is Carter G. Woodson.

“Black History Month emanated from Negro History Week and the work of Dr. Carter G. Woodson, in 1926, during the interwar period and Harlem Renaissance,” Gaither said. “I think it is important to be mindful of this fact, to avoid revisionist history.”

Gaither said he believes people should read Woodson’s works.

“One of the most important exercises in which every person should engage is a cover-to-cover read of Woodson’s seminal works ‘Miseducation of the Negro’ and ‘The Negro in Our History,’” Gaither said.

Gaither’s interest in intercultural relations has led him to obtain two masters degrees — one from Dartmouth University and one from Baylor University. 

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Alvin

This is my own individual personal opinion not to be confused with anything else.

I disagree with this writer. First of all, the writer seems to be confusing Black history and miscegenation, a study of the interbreeding between the races.

Copy: 'A Killeen native who has graduated at the top of his class in multiple schools, has dedicated a lot of his time in recent years to understanding mixed-race relations, and he said his studies are connected to black history.' End of copy.

Where does the connection of Black history have anything to do with the understanding of 'mixed race relations'?

Copy: 'Eric Gaither, a contracted researcher has also worked as a researcher at the Gerald R. Ford Library in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he has conducted research about the impact of the Self-Determination Act under the Ford administration on Native Americans and African American freedmen.' End of copy.

I give you a presentation of Roosevelt who said in 1907, a little bit after the Ford Administration in which he said:

'The year is 1907, one hundred and nine years ago.

Theodore Roosevelt's ideas on immigrants and being an American in 1907.

'In the first place we should insist that if the immigrant comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, that he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate any such man because of creed, birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated on in every facet his becoming an American... There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have but room for one flag, an American flag... We have room but for one language here and that is the English language.. And we room for but one sole loyalty and that is loyalty to the American people.'

This is the America that I want to be a part of, not some fractured anomaly that pretends to America but somehow doesn't seem to fit the bill and this goes for all Americans regardless of color.

Copy: 'The act gave tribes power to exercise their own sovereignty and “control their own affairs,” according to the National Library of Medicine.' End of copy.

This, I believe, is not what our forefathers wrote those famous words: 'We The People', for it did not matter what color they were, just that they had a desire to be an American who spoke English and a oneness with other Americans who felt the same way as in a oneness or unique awareness of one-man-ship for if you don't have that, then you are not an American'

Copy: 'Gaither said his studies connect to black history, because in the Jim Crow era, many people groups, such as Italians, Asians and Czechs, were considered Negro. Because of the Negro classification for those groups, Gaither said many of them mingled and associated themselves with African Americans.' End of copy.

Gain, more or less a function of modern history and in no way should it be connected to the original writings of Colonial history of 1776 to 1787. And I must say, I begrudge the use of 'African Americans' as the Blacks from this country have so little in terms of the African race, but skin coloration, so I believe the Blacks from this country would be lost if they should want to mingle with blacks from Africa.

Copy: 'Most recently, Gaither has learned Czech, through Blinn College in Schulenburg, and Cherokee from the Cherokee Nation Learning Center in Talequah, Oklahoma.' End of copy.

And now is the center point of the topic of this discussion. Recently I watched a study in which the topic was on the DNA of the America's Indian group in which it was thought that the DNA was transported across the land bridge which was visible 12,000 to 14,000 years ago and when it was discovered by paleontologists that this was not the case, that they had none of the DNA from across the land bridge, they were a unique and individualized member of our genetic family. And this is unique for all of the America's, North, Central, and South America. So there is no possibility that someone from the America's could be attached to a member of the European country of Czechoslovakia.

So I rest my case and again implore the citizens of the American Nation to use some restraint in trying to become an anomaly of the African country and be proud of this country and as we say, 'So Help Me God', be proud of your Christian heritage.

Welcome to the discussion.

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