MONEY

Killeen is expected to receive more than $3 million in sales tax revenue this month, a 16.94% increase from the $2.63 million allocation distributed in November 2020, according to the state comptroller’s office. That’s an increase of about $446,151 to the city coffers over the same month last year.

Killeen and all other area counties and cities will receive higher allocations this November compared to a year ago. The allocations are derived from sales taxes collected in October, according to the comptroller’s office.

Killeen and most other local cities have seen an increase in sales tax allocations since the pandemic hit the area more than a year ago.

Year to date, Killeen has received a total of $29 million, which is 18.22% higher than it received through the first nine months in 2020.

Sales tax revenue goes into the city government’s general fund. This year’s budget was created with a projected increase of approximately 1.5% in sales tax revenue. So far, year-to-date sales taxes have increased by over 18%, well above City Manager Kent Cagle’s estimate of 1.5%.

In all of 2020, Killeen’s sales tax revenue was $26.7 million, 7.66% higher than 2019’s allocations, when the city was allocated $24.8 million, according to the comptroller’s report in December. This means that Killeen made approximately $1.9 million more from sales tax revenue in 2020 than it did in 2019.

From November 2020 to November 2021, Killeen received $33.87 million. From November 2019 to November 2020, Killeen received more than $28.78 million.

This indicates that in the last 13 months, Killeen has received approximately $6.09 million more than it did in the same 13-month period the year before.

Statewide

The state has experienced a continued upswing in sales tax revenue since Jan. 1.

Texas cities, counties, transit systems and special-purpose taxing districts statewide will receive $1.1 billion in sales tax allocations in November, according to a news release from Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar.

Statewide, the total allocations represent a 20.6% increase from the allocations distributed in November 2020, or approximately $182.76 million, with special purpose taxing districts seeing the largest increase of 18.9% from last year.

Other sales tax revenues in the area are as follows:

Bell County

Bell County will receive $8.08 million in sales tax allocations in November, an increase of 20.94% from this time last year.

Harker Heights will receive $955,223, a 17.26% increase from November 2020.

Nolanville saw a sales tax percentage increase of 20.36% from last November, as it is set to receive $148,250 this November.

Temple is set to receive $2.9 million, a 24.05% increase from last November.

Belton will receive $797,214, a 32.88% increase from this time last year.

Coryell County

Coryell County will receive $260,176.98, for a 16.20% increase over last November’s allocations.

Copperas Cove saw a 16.42% increase in November allocations over last year; it is set to receive $652,976.

Gatesville saw a 15.6% increase in sales tax allocations, receiving $235,606 in November.

Oglesby, a town of about 500 people in northeast Coryell County, will see a modest increase of 14.77%. It has been allocated $2,060 this November.

Lampasas County

Lampasas County will receive $102,819.84, which represents a 21.23% increase from last November’s allocation.

The city of Lampasas will receive $242,90 in November, 21.43% more than last November.

Kempner will see an increase of 27.31% from last November. It is set to receive $13,615.

jdowling@kdhnews.com | 254-501-7552

(3) comments

Noneofyourbiz

When citizens are paying more for an item at a store, of course you will see more revenue from sales tax.

Example: (I am just picking easy numbers to show)

Last year An item that cost a $1.00 the sales tax was $0.05.

That means at cash register it cost $1.05

This year the same item cost $2.00

Sales tax would be $0.10 so that item would cost $2.10

because each dollar is taxed and sell tax didn't go up but the cost of living did.

So basically when inflation hits citizens pocket books, the city will see high tax revenue. At the same time the city will also see an increase in cost of items as well.

Inflation, hyper inflation has a cause and effect, sadly when politics are in play, of course they are going to make it sound like the city is gaining and it is a benefit to citizens.

When actually inflation cause a increase in sells tax and will only benefit the federal government and thier over spending on the build back better bull.

Just remember nickel and dime criminals make big money at the cost of the poor, elderly and weak.

PUREBLOODResistTyranny

And don't forget all the illegal invaders that the communists want to give money to for breaking the law.

Noneofyourbiz

When money is passed out it also has a cause and effect. Some call it stimulus.

Example,

A strip club owner takes $50.00 in ones and puts 5 singles in 10 girls garter they wear on thier leg.

This done to motivate customers to tip and buy drinks.

The ideal is, if the customer sees money 🤑 he will in turn put a dollar 💵 in the kitty 🐈.

This stimulates spending.

This also works with our government, if all of a sudden people get free money they spend, others see this and they spend, the government uses it to collect more tax revenue off the same dollar they already taxes. ( Just like the strip club owner, he used the same money he just took from the customer at the door).

Even stimulation doesn't drive down prices. It cause some prices to increase and this effects once again those that are already poor, elder and those on a fix income ( like disabled vets, disabled and so on.

Food and majority of consumer product prices never come down, even when gas prices go down.

I do not agree with the government giving money to those that broke the law. The government don't give money to law breakers while they are in jail separated from thier families for selling a little bit of smoke.

We be better off legalizing smoke, and stimulating the economy this way. Than some half baked toss good money after bad money plan.

Now I must go and polish my high heels.

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