Scottish Rite 100 Logo

Scottish Rite 100 Logo

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DALLAS, Oct. 4, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- On October 10, Scottish Rite for Children is celebrating a huge milestone as it marks its centennial year of giving children back their childhood. For a century, this remarkable institution has provided excellent care and introduced many innovative treatments in pediatric orthopedics to become a world leader in healing children's muscles, joints and bones.

Scottish Rite for Children is turning 100 years young. Scottish Rite has pioneered the field of pediatric orthopedics.

Scottish Rite was established in 1921 amid the polio epidemic. A group of Texas Masons approached Dallas's first orthopedic surgeon, W. B. Carrell, M.D., about providing treatment to children affected by polio, regardless of their families' ability to pay. Soon after the clinic opened, word began to spread about a one-of-a-kind place made specifically for kids, attracting families from across the state.

When Scottish Rite for Children was founded, the field of orthopedics was in its infancy. In the decades since, Scottish Rite has revolutionized the industry through patient care, research and education.

"For 100 years, Scottish Rite for Children's mission has never wavered," said Robert L. Walker, president and CEO. "Throughout the years, each staff member, volunteer, trustee, friend and donor has focused on how we can improve the lives of the children we serve locally and around the world."

Because children's bodies are still growing, orthopedic conditions or injuries require highly specialized expertise. For thousands of pediatric orthopedic patients across the United States, treatment can take years of surgeries, doctor visits and rehabilitation. Today, Scottish Rite has helped more than 335,000 patients maximize their potential and realize their dreams.

From gymnastics and drumming to playing and everything in between, the children in Scottish Rite's care are able to do incredible things. Former patients have even gone on to be superheroes and represent the U.S. in the Tokyo Olympics and as the Ambassador to Sweden.

Today, the organization is known for being a bright, child-friendly place that does not look, feel or smell like a hospital. Across Scottish Rite's three locations in North Texas, every detail is designed specifically for children.

Here are several fun facts in honor of Scottish Rite's centennial celebration:

  • Scottish Rite's colorful hallways are kept free of medical equipment and filled instead with the smell of buttery popcorn – volunteers pop 6,000 pounds per year.
  • Scottish Rite is consistently ranked among the top five pediatric orthopedic programs in the U.S.
  • With more than 50 patents on revolutionary medical devices and 280 active research projects, Scottish Rite's Research department is dedicated to discovering innovative treatment techniques and the root causes of orthopedic conditions such as scoliosis, clubfoot and hip conditions.
  • Scottish Rite is credited with the discovery and mapping of genes associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.
  • Scottish Rite experts wrote the textbook used to train orthopedic surgeons worldwide.
  • More than 190 fellows have graduated from its competitive clinical training programs.
  • The consensus medical definition of dyslexia was developed on Scottish Rite for Children's campus in 1965.
  • Scottish Rite has been named a "Top 100 Workplace" by Dallas Morning News three years in a row.
  • There have only been four chiefs of staff in the past 100 years: W. B. Carrell, M.D.; his son Brandon Carrell, M.D.; J.A. "Tony" Herring, M.D.; and Daniel J. Sucato, M.D., M.S.
  • Scottish Rite's Occupational Therapy department was the first community project undertaken by the Junior League of Dallas, which is also celebrating its centennial this year.
  • The organization has welcomed famous visitors, including Charlie Chaplin, Mickey Mouse, Tom Landry, Nolan Ryan, Michael Johnson, Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, First Lady Hillary Clinton and, more recently, players from the Dallas Cowboys, Dallas Mavericks and Dallas Stars.

When President Clinton gave his Presidential Radio Address from Scottish Rite for Children's Dallas campus in 1994, he called it "one of the finest pediatric medical centers in America," recalling that "places like Scottish Rite don't ask children with severe disabilities or serious illnesses, 'Can you pay?' They just ask, 'How can I help?'"

In honor of its milestone birthday, the organization is renewing its commitment to another 100 years of providing the very best care to children with orthopedic conditions and learning disorders.

Scottish Rite for Children is halfway toward its goal of raising $100 million in its first-ever capital campaign for patient care, research and expansion and renovation. 

Donations will allow Scottish Rite to continue its century-long tradition of ensuring cost is never a barrier to receiving the highest level of care.

The Dallas skyline will light up Sunday, October 10, to mark the occasion.

To learn more or donate, visit scottishrite100.org.

About Scottish Rite for Children

Scottish Rite for Children is a world-renowned leader in the treatment of orthopedic conditions such as scoliosis, clubfoot, hand differences, hip disorders, sports injuries and fractures, as well as certain related arthritic and neurological disorders and learning disorders such as dyslexia. Visit scottishriteforchildren.org to learn more.

CONTACT:

Alex Yap

972-249-5107

SOURCE Scottish Rite for Children

This article originally ran on curated.tncontentexchange.com.

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